12 Jan 2012 wingo   » (Master)

javascript eval considered crazy

Peoples. I was hacking recently on JavaScriptCore, and I came to a realization: JavaScript's eval is absolutely crazy.

I mean, I thought I knew this before. But... words fail me, so I'll have to show a few examples.

eval and introduced bindings

This probably isn't worth mentioning, as you probably know it, but eval can introduce lexical bindings:

 > var foo = 10;
 > (function (){ eval('var foo=20;'); return foo; })()
 > foo

I find this to be pretty insane already, but I knew about it. You would think though that var x = 10; and eval('var x = 10;'); would be the same, though, but they're not:

 > (function (){ var x = 10; return delete x; })()
 > (function (){ eval('var x = 10;'); return delete x; })()

eval-introduced bindings do not have the DontDelete property set on them, according to the post-hoc language semantics, so unlike proper lexical variables, they may be deleted.

when is eval really eval?

Imagine you are trying to analyze some JavaScript code. If you see eval(...), is it really eval?

Not necessarily.

eval pretends to be a regular, mutable binding, so it can be rebound:

 > eval = print
 > eval('foo')
 foo // printed

or, shadowed lexically:

 > function () { var eval = print; eval('foo'); }
 foo // printed

or, shadowed dynamically:

 > with({'eval': print}) { eval('foo'); }
 foo // printed

You would think that if you can somehow freeze the eval binding on the global object, and verify that there are no with forms, and no statements of the form var eval = ..., that you could guarantee that eval is eval, but that is not the case:

 > Object.freeze(this);
 > (function (x){ return [eval(x), eval(x)]; })('var eval = print; 10')
 var eval = print; 10 // printed, only once!

(Here the first eval created a local binding for eval, and evaluated to 10. The second eval was actually a print.)


an eval by any other name

So eval is an identifier that can be bound to another value. OK. One would expect to be able to bind another identifier to eval, then. Does that work? It seems to work:

 > var foo = eval;
 > foo('foo') === eval;

But not really:

 > (function (){ var quux = 10; return foo('quux'); } )()
 Exception: ReferenceError: Can't find variable: quux

eval by any other name isn't eval. (More specifically, eval by any other name doesn't have access to lexical scope.)

Note, however, the mere presence of a shadowed declaration of eval doesn't mean that eval isn't eval:

 > var foo = 10
 > (function(x){ var eval = x; var foo = 20; return [x('foo'), eval('foo')] })(eval)


strict mode restrictions

ECMAScript 5 introduces "strict mode", which prevents eval from being rebound:

 > (function(){ "use strict"; var eval = print; })
 Exception: SyntaxError: Cannot declare a variable named 'eval' in strict mode.
 > (function(){ "use strict"; eval = print; })
 Exception: SyntaxError: 'eval' cannot be modified in strict mode
 > (function(){ "use strict"; eval('eval = print;'); })()
 Exception: SyntaxError: 'eval' cannot be modified in strict mode
 > (function(x){"use strict"; x.eval = print; return eval('eval');})(this)
 Exception: TypeError: Attempted to assign to readonly property.

But, since strict mode is embedded in "classic mode", it's perfectly fine to mutate eval from outside strict mode, and strict mode has to follow suit:

 > eval = print;
 > (function(){"use strict"; return eval('eval');})()
 eval // printed

The same is true of non-strict lexical bindings for eval:

 > (function(){ var eval = print; (function(){"use strict"; return eval('eval');})();})();
 eval // printed
 > with({'eval':print}) { (function(){ "use strict"; return eval('eval');})() }
 eval // printed

An engine still has to check at run-time that eval is really eval. This crazy behavior will be with us as long as classic mode, which is to say, forever.

Strict-mode eval does have the one saving grace that it cannot introduce lexical bindings, so implementors do get a break there, but it's a poor consolation prize.

in summary

What can an engine do when it sees eval?

Not much. It can't even prove that it is actually eval unless eval is not bound lexically, there is no with, there is no intervening non-strict call to any identifier eval (regardless of whether it is eval or not), and the global object's eval property is bound to the blessed eval function, and is configured as DontDelete and ReadOnly (not the default in web browsers).

But the very fact that an engine sees a call to an identifier eval poisons optimization: because eval can introduce variables, the scope of free variables is no longer lexically apparent, in many cases.

I'll say it again: crazy!!!

Syndicated 2012-01-12 16:34:08 from wingolog

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