Older blog entries for softkid (starting at number 299)

The tram got of the rails this morning in front of my house

So I filmed it. Framing is bad and part of the image is missing because I exported the video in HD. I'll do better next time.

Syndicated 2012-01-05 17:54:40 (Updated 2012-01-05 17:55:45) from Ludovic's weblog

Third call for sessions for the FOSDEM cross-distribution miniconference

FOSDEM is a yearly conference that takes place in the campus Solbosch of
the Université Libre the Bruxelles, in Brussels, Belgium. The upcoming
edition of FOSDEM will happen during the first weekend of February, that
is, the 4th and 5th of February, 2012.

During the past two editions, there has been a distributions
miniconference at FOSDEM, inviting talks from all distribution projects.
Distributions that have cooperated in the past include Debian, Fedora,
CentOS, openSUSE, Mandriva, NixOS, and more.

The distributions miniconference will happen again this year, and we are
still seeking proposals for sessions.

I've sent out two previous calls for sessions for the miniconference
that set the deadline for talk proposals to December 22nd, 2011, which
is tomorrow.

A list of current proposals can be found at
.
There are some interesting proposals there, but unfortunately there
aren't enough; we'll have two rooms for two days, which means we'll have
around 32 hours worth of talk slots.>

A variety of sessions are welcome; round-table talks, BoFs as well as
presentations, on any subject related to distribution development.
Sessions can be about a subject specific to one particular distribution,
or can be targetted to distribution developers in general.

As said, the original deadline was December 22nd, but I am hereby
extending the deadline until January 1st, 2012.

People interested in holding a talk or chairing a BoF or round table are
hereby invited to submit a proposal to the
distributions@lists.fosdem.org mailinglist (moderated for
non-subscribers), containing the following information:

- their name,
- a (short) bio,
- a title for the session,
- an abstract for the session,
- an expected duration for the session, including time for questions by
the audience.

Note that the distributions@lists.fosdem.org mailinglist may also be
used to discuss possible BoFs or round tables before actually formally
proposing a session, or for general discussion relating to the
miniconference.

Syndicated 2011-12-29 06:57:19 (Updated 2011-12-29 06:58:07) from Ludovic's weblog

Lightning and Thunderbird testing week, a post mortem.

Last week we had our last (to date) community testing effort and the focus was Thunderbird 10 and Lightning 1.0. This was a first for me, dealing with two products during the same week and dealing with a product I don't use too much. I was not too confident that the test cases available for Lightning were up to date - but I thought that some testing was better than none. So I did My usual call to testers using the too many ways we have to do that :


  • Mail to testers

  • Newsgroup post

  • blog post

  • mozillazine post


And I didn't do that on the same day but on the course of two weeks. And I got a bit stressed and worried because the numbers of answers I got was very low. And then Philipp posted on the Calendar blog and my mailbox got filled with people willing to spend some time testing.
The plan was to send instructions when I would get back from mozcamp in Berlin and start the testing effort. Unfortunately I came back sick and was in bed for most of the testing week. I did send instructions and then left my computer unattended for the week as I was sleeping and fighting fever. The instructions I sent did the job for most of the volunteers that had signed up for Thunderbird testing but were confusing to say the least for the many new comers who had signed up for Lightning.

I would like to apologize to the people who wanted to help but got confusing instructions f from me.
I would like to thanks standard8 for getting into #tb-qa and answering people.

And I would like to point out our results :

And I've learned a lot on something I thought I mastered so next time it won't happen the same way for sure.

Syndicated 2011-11-22 10:09:48 (Updated 2011-11-22 10:35:08) from Ludovic's weblog

Mozilla Camp Eu 2011

Last week-end I had the pleasure to attend MozCamp Europe 2011 in Berlin, Germany. As always those events are for me the occasion to meet the people involved in the product I work on.
Mobile We are !
It was interesting to listen to old face that were ranting. It was nice to see and meet new people or people I wouldn't expect to see in Berlin (nice idea to mix an AMO editors meeting with the event). I arrived a bit late on the first evening, but not as late a some, so I had the pleasure to enjoy a german-like diner and the time to meet most of the french crowd that was around. Giving us a taste of history as our first social act was nice - even If i had seen the video before. Ended up having drinks with a few old timers and that did wrap up the evening.
Like in whistler I shared my room with Tonnes - a contributor from the Netherlands. Tonnes mind you translate most of the knowledge base article from both sumo and sumomo. While we chatted he told me that was roughly around 20 hours of his time devoted to the task on a weekly basis (a good part of it being sucked into following what Mozilla does and where it goes).
The next day started with a bunch of updates on where Mozilla was going and that was quite interesting - even if I skipped the end to go sign up some pgp keys with two Berliners.
The afternoon was pretty packed - with JB presenting's his vision of where Thunderbird will go. Then Protz giving a 101 demo on how to build and make interesting extensions for Thunderbird - Both presentation had full rooms (room name was mosaic) - which was better than what we had achieved at the last mozcamp. I then followed Florian's presentation of Instantbird - and I still owe him a why I prefer Adium email.
We ended the day having diner in a cave - diner was nice but the place was a bit crowded and very noisy for some. I did meet a new mozillian over diner - but I believe that it was more due to luck than anything else (big hello to mcsmurf).
The next day was more based around private conversation and introducing people to each other. Overall a very long week-end but very productive too. Of course I ended up taking pictures and they are available on flickr.

Syndicated 2011-11-21 17:37:56 (Updated 2011-11-21 16:31:03) from Ludovic's weblog

Mozilla Camp Eu 2011

Last week-end I had the pleasure to attend MozCamp Europe 2011 in Berlin, Germany. As always those events are for me the occasion to meet the people involved in the product I work on.
Mobile We are !
It was interesting to listen to old face that were ranting. It was nice to see and meet new people or people I wouldn't expect to see in Berlin (nice idea to mix an AMO editors meeting with the event). I arrived a bit late on the first evening, but not as late a some, so I had the pleasure to enjoy a german-like diner and the time to meet most of the french crowd that was around. Giving us a taste of history as our first social act was nice - even If i had seen the video before. Ended up having drinks with a few old timers and that did wrap up the evening.
Like in whistler I shared my room with Tonnes - a contributor from the Netherlands. Tonnes mind you translate most of the knowledge base article from both sumo and sumomo. While we chatted he told me that was roughly around 20 hours of his time devoted to the task on a weekly basis (a good part of it being sucked into following what Mozilla does and where it goes).
The next day started with a bunch of updates on where Mozilla was going and that was quite interesting - even if I skipped the end to go sign up some pgp keys with two Berliners.
The afternoon was pretty packed - with JB presenting's his vision of where Thunderbird will go. Then Protz giving a 101 demo on how to build and make interesting extensions for Thunderbird - Both presentation had full rooms (room name was mosaic) - which was better than what we had achieved at the last mozcamp. I then followed Florian's presentation of Instantbird - and I still owe him a why I prefer Adium email.
We ended the day having diner in a cave - diner was nice but the place was a bit crowded and very noisy for some. I did meet a new mozillian over diner - but I believe that it was more due to luck than anything else (big hello to mcsmurf).
The next day was more based around private conversation and introducing people to each other. Overall a very long week-end but very productive too. Of course I ended up taking pictures and they are available on flickr.

Syndicated 2011-11-21 17:37:56 (Updated 2011-11-21 16:25:56) from Ludovic's weblog

Mozilla Camp Eu 2011

Last week-end I had the pleasure to attend MozCamp Europe 2011 in Berlin, Germany. As always those events are for me the occasion to meet the people involved in the product I work on.
Mobile We are !
It was interesting to listen to old face that were ranting. It was nice to see and meet new people or people I wouldn't expect to see in Berlin (nice idea to mix an AMO editors meeting with the event). I arrived a bit late on the first evening, but not as late a some, so I had the pleasure to enjoy a german-like diner and the time to meet most of the french crowd that was around. Giving us a taste of history as our first social act was nice - even If i had seen the video before. Ended up having drinks with a few old timers and that did wrap up the evening.
Like in whistler I shared my room with Tonnes - a contributor from the Netherlands. Tonnes mind you translate most of the knowledge base article from both sumo and sumomo. While we chatted he told me that was roughly around 20 hours of his time devoted to the task on a weekly basis (a good part of it being sucked into following what Mozilla does and where it goes).
The next day started with a bunch of updates on where Mozilla was going and that was quite interesting - even if I skipped the end to go sign up some pgp keys with two Berliners.
The afternoon was pretty packed - with JB presenting's his vision of where Thunderbird will go. Then Protz giving a 101 demo on how to build and make interesting extensions for Thunderbird - Both presentation had full rooms (room name was mosaic) - which was better than what we had achieved at the last mozcamp. I then followed Florian's presentation of Instantbird - and I still owe him a why I prefer Adium email.
We ended the day having diner in a cave - diner was nice but the place was a bit crowded and very noisy for some. I did meet a new mozillian over diner - but I believe that it was more due to luck than anything else (big hello to mcsmurf).
The next day was more based around private conversation and introducing people to each other. Overall a very long week-end but very productive too. Of course I ended up taking pictures and they are available on flickr.

Syndicated 2011-11-21 17:37:56 (Updated 2011-11-21 16:20:19) from Ludovic's weblog

Test event centered around Thunderbird 10 and Lightning 1.0

It's been a while since we had a testing event. Some of it was probably my fault as I needed to adjust myself to the new release process we adopted since Thunderbird 5.0. Since then I've been lonely testing releases and new features as they came out. It's time to spend a good amount of time testing Thunderbird more thoroughly. We will use litmus as our main testing tool. In litmus you will find groups of test (eg one for address book, one for imap, one for news). Each group is made of one or more tests that needs to be run. As I want to distribute the workload and not only have a few areas tested, I would like you to sign up and tell me that you want to participate to this event.

What is required to participate :

  • An email account that can be used for testing
  • a litmus account
  • an account on bugzilla.mozilla.org
  • some time in the week of 13Th November to 20th November 2011
What will the workflow of this event look like
  • You read this
  • you reply to it - telling me you want to participate
  • On the day the event starts (times will be Central European time) You'll receive an email with:
  1. what to test (eg groups of test I've assigned to you)
  2. a link to the test in litmus
  3. a bugzilla bug number which we will use to track bug found during this event
  4. more detailed instructions on how to use litmus and bugzilla
  5. You organize yourself to run the tests when you have time
  6. You do the tests and give us reports and file bugs if the tests aren't successful

That's it. I will Post results in the middle and at the end of the event.

At the same time we would also like to run the same kind of event for lightning as it's the most used extension with Thunderbird. The workflow will look exactly the same. Just make sure that you tell me you want to test Thunderbird, Thunderbird/Lightning or just Lightning.

Right now the number of people who signed up is below 10 and it would be nice if I could get a few more volunteers in order to be able to have a large coverage of our tests. The best way to reply to this is to send me an email.

Syndicated 2011-11-09 08:40:33 (Updated 2011-11-09 08:53:01) from Ludovic's weblog

Are you using Thunderbird in an enterprise environment ?

If so we would like to get some feedback from you - see this Thread on the Thunderbird enterprise mailing list.

Syndicated 2011-10-30 12:13:45 (Updated 2011-10-28 11:15:28) from Ludovic's weblog

How to Geotag pictures on flickr

I'l try to go thru all the techniques I know and I've used to add geographical information to pictures, so they can be mapped to an actual point on a world map.

Why flickr ?

Because it's the online service I use to expose my photos to the world. Some of the techniques explained here can be used with other services - but as I don't use them you'll need dear reader to find the tweaks needed.

Using the provided map

Is probably the best solution. You just snap the picture and when you upload it you move it to the proper spot on the map.
Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Fast
Cons:
  • Some maps are incomplete so you can't geotag that way
  • Where do you put the picture , where you where or where the subject was

Using an external GPS source

This requires a little bit more of hardware than your camera - but you will be able to geotag pictures where the map isn't accurate enough (like for say this picture). You'll need your camera, a gps device capable of logging gps coordinates and some software. The software will match pictures and longitudes and latitudes. The way this work is quite simple : each time the gps write a log entry it also logs the time. When you press the shutter button, the camera also records the time. The Piece of software will read both files and do a matching based on those time stamps (I use GPS photo linker on my mac, and heard good reviews from geosetter).
Pros :

  • Not too complex
  • Tags anywhere on earth
Cons:
  • More post processing
  • cost of the device
  • need to think about some extra batteries for the device

Using alternate services

I know of at least two. They both use google maps which is the most accurate maps available for free online (AFAIK). And they will geotag your pictures using the flickr API. These services are http://loc.alize.us/ and http://maps.yuan.cc/. They both use the same data , and I have noticed any differences using those services. I did use use these services because I didn't always have a GPS, or the gps with me.

Last but not least I've just found out a nice way to geotag pictures taken while flying on planes the explanations are here.

Syndicated 2011-10-17 13:14:34 (Updated 2011-10-17 13:59:57) from Ludovic's weblog

15 Oct 2011 (updated 21 Nov 2011 at 16:05 UTC) »

How I started being involved in mozilla

Once upon a time I used to be a Desktop linux user , and OS/2 user and a BeOS user. Back in 1999, around the M8 release - Be Inc. did a port of mozilla. This meant that my favorite os would have a better browser than Netpositive that couldn't even render /.

At this time I was working for ITSgroup, installing, deploying Computer Associates software at clients - and my laptop was able to only run Linux or Windows. My home only had a slow modem with very pricey access fee to the net. So I decided that I could use the bandwidth available at work ( a whooping 2 MB ) to test Mozilla on either Linux or Windows and report bugs. I thought that fixing bugs on linux, windows would also fix bugs on the product Be would release.

And Be went to the toilet, and I switched to the then very nice toy os that Mac OS X 10.0 was. I tried to participate to opendarwin, tried mach-o builds when they were experimental. But Mozilla at that time was really unusable on mac os. But I kept using it on my work machines because of the tab feature. Trying to report bug when I could.

One day I stubble upon something called Chimera. Ho and that was able to browse the web, and it was fast, slick and efficient, so every now and then I would download the latest version and run it. I don't remember how, but at some point I made the connection with Camino and Mozilla - something I was familiar with. That was just before the release of Camino 0.7. The Camino effort almost got killed when Apple released Safari. Unfortunately Safari didn't let me log on my favorite site at that time the mighty ubix.org. So I kept using he browser that worked for me: Camino

In July of that same year, the mozilla/netscape teams got fired and I wanted Camino to make progress , so I started to annoy Mike Pinkerton, Simon Woodside to make Camino more a community effort. I started this blog for that purpose - see my post from that time in the mozilla/camino section. #camino appeared on irc.mozilla.org and we started working towards 0.8. A few months later the build requirement changed, and I couldn't help with dev so I started working on making l10n work for Camino. At the same time I needed a proper email client so I used Thunderbird and tried to report bugs.

In 2004 Tristan made more noise about Fosdem, and agreed to give me a ride back from Brussels if I attended. So I went and had a blast - I met Patrick the author of enigmail, Alex from svg and jssh fame.

In 2006 my personal life went upside down so I decided not to continue Camino related activities, I got a job offer in Holland from Alex who I had met at fosdem again in 2005 and 2006. I took the offer as QA lead for Joost a video client based on xulrunner. That started my professional life doing quality assurance. In 2008, we stopped doing mozilla related things and at fosdem I talked to Peterv and he simply said send a resume over if you want to do more Mozilla related things. That got me thinking - It reminded me david's email about the start of mozillamessaging and I ended up applying for their QA lead position. After tow rounds of interviews (I refused after the first round because I was starting to see someone and thought I wouldn't have the time to do a proper job) I started in February 2009 working full time on Thunderbird.

Syndicated 2011-10-15 08:18:52 (Updated 2011-11-10 11:56:58) from Ludovic's weblog

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