6 Mar 2004 raph   » (Master)

I voted touchscreen! I think

At least I think I voted. There's no way of knowing for sure, because it was on one of those fancy new Diebold machines.

The problem is, of course, familiar to those experienced in computer security. Because it's impossible to see security flaws, and very difficult, even for experts, to understand them, people get very complacent. Judges, for example, are wont to dismiss knowledge of such vulnerabilities as "speculative", rather than an "actual threat".

What changes the status quo is invariably an actual exploit. If people can see a voting machine being hacked, then they'll believe it. Fortunately, in this case it ought to be relatively easy.

I don't think it's time yet for large-scale civil disobedience about hackable voting. The most important thing, I think, is to spread the word about the dangers. As Avi Rubin points out, many election judges are elderly folk without a deep understanding of security flaws. I spoke with my election judges briefly. I told them that I was a computer scientist, and that maybe I know the secret to cracking the smart card they gave me. When I gave it back to them and informed them that I didn't, in fact, mess with it, they were visibly relieved.

I also liked Avi's idea of volunteering as a judge. That's probably the single best way to get the word out in a positive way.

In any case, after I voted I got a little sticker that says "I voted - touchscreen" with an American flag on it. Maybe for the election this November, we should hand out stickers with the slogan "I think I voted - touchscreen", and a flag with the 50 stars replaced by a BSOD.

Letter quality LCD's

I think this is going to be the year they go mainstream. They're showing up in more and more devices. It's also interesting that Tiger Direct has the IBM T221 for four grand, "while supplies last". It's possible, I think, that a newer model is in the pipeline.

Logic update

I got a very gratifying response from my last post, resulting in a very enlightening email correspondence with Michael Norrish, Bob Solovay, and Norm Megill. I'll post it soon, for those of you out there just dying to find out whether there really is a closed form expression for HOL's epsilon in ZFC.

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