Older blog entries for oubiwann (starting at number 305)

lfetool 0.2 Released

This release of lfetool has a bunch of new interesting features -- too much to cover in a tweet, so it's getting a little blog post ;-)

Here are the high-level bits that should make users' lives better:
  • New yaws project type, provided for building basic web sites; includes the exemplar project as a dependency for generating HTML with S-expressions.
  • Every project now gets TravisCI support by default.
  • Unit tests, integration tests, and systems tests now each have their own dir.
  • Tests now get run in parallel for faster run times.
  • Added support for running on Linux and *BSD systems.
  • Added unit tests for lfetool itself (shUnit) (for checking skeleton-generation and tool options).
  • lfetool has a new logo :-)
Note that the version jumped from 0.1.2 to 0.2.0 due to the strong improvements in quality and feature set of the tool. Forth-coming features include:
  • Support for an e2 service skeleton project.
  • Support for a YAWS-RESTful service skeleton project.
  • Support for YAWS embedded in a skeleton OTP application.
  • Support for YAWS + Exemplar + Bootstrap projects
  • Support for slide decks with Exemplare + Reveal.js
If you've got more ideas for the lfetool wishlist, post a comment here or send an email to the LFE mailing list.


Syndicated 2014-03-18 23:29:00 (Updated 2014-03-18 23:29:53) from Duncan McGreggor

13 Mar 2014 (updated 14 Mar 2014 at 20:15 UTC) »

The Future of LFE

Erlang Factory

First of all, Erlang Factory this year was just phenomenal: great talks, great energy, and none of the feared/anticipated "acquisition feeding frenzy." Instead, everyone was genuinely happy for WhatsApp and Cloudant, and with celebrations aside, they were ready to get on with the conference and dive into the tech :-)

And gosh, there was a bunch of good tech. If you don't believe me, check out the schedule. Also on that page are the speaker pics. For talks that have video or slides pushed up, the speaker pic is visually annotated and linked.

There's so much good stuff there -- I've definitely got my watching queue set up for the next few weeks ...

LFE Presentation

I gave a presentation on LFE which covered everything from motivational basics for using a Lisp in the 21st century, gave a taste of LFE in small chunks, and then took folks on a quick tour of creating projects in LFE. There was also some dessert of fun side/research projects that are currently in-progress. The slides for the presentation are here; also the slide source code is available (related demo project). I'd also like to give a shout out to the Hoplon crew for their help in making sure I could create this presentation in a Lisp (Clojure), and not HTML ;-) (It uses a Hoplon-based Reveal.js library.)

The Good Stuff

After the presentation, several of us chatted about Lisp and Erlang for a while. Robert and I later continued along these lines after heading over to the quiet of the ever-cool Marines Memorial 11th-floor library (complete with fireplace). Here we sketched out some of the interesting areas for future development in LFE. I'm not sure if I'm remembering everything (I've also added stuff that we didn't discuss in the library, like Sean Chalmers' recent experiments with types; blog and discussion):
  • getting the REPL to the point where full dev can happen (defining functions, macros, and records in the LFE shell)
  • adding macros (maybe just one) for easier use of Mnesia in LFE 
  • discussing the possibility of an LFE stdlib
  • gathering some of the best funcs and macros in the wild for inclusion in an LFE stdlib
  • possibly supporting both (: module func ...) and (module:func ...) syntax
  • possibly getting spec and type support in LFE
  • producing an LFE 1.0 release
Additional efforts planned:
  • building out an LFE rebar plugin
  • examining erlang.mk as another possible option
  • starting work on an LFE Cookbook
  • creating demos of LFE on Erjang
  • creating demos of LFE-Clojure interop via JInterface
  • creating more involved YAWS/REST examples with LFE
  • explore the possibility of an SOA tutorial with LFE + YAWS 
  • async tasks in LFE with rpc lib 
  • monad tutorial for LFE (practical, not conceptual)
  • releasing a planner demo
  • finishing the genetic programming examples
  • LFE style guide
  • producing a stdlib contribution guideline
  • continued work on the LFE user guide
I'll dump all these into github issues so they'll be easier to track.

If this stuff is exciting to you, feel free to jump into the low-volume discussions we have on the mail list.

More soon!


Syndicated 2014-03-13 12:29:00 (Updated 2014-03-14 20:11:13) from Duncan McGreggor

13 Jan 2014 (updated 13 Jan 2014 at 20:03 UTC) »

Prefix Operators in Haskell

I wanted to name this post something a little more catchy, like "McCarthy's Dream: Haskell as Lisp's M-Expressions" but I couldn't quite bring myself to do it. If s-expressions had greater support in Haskell, I would totally have gone for it, but alas, they don't.

However, there is still reason to celebrate: many Haskell operators do support prefix notation! This was a mind-blower to me, since I hadn't  heard about this until last night...

At the Data Day Texas conference this past Saturday, O'Reilly/StrataConf had a fantastic booth. Among the many cool give-aways they were doing, I obtained a coupon for a free ebook and another for 50% off. Upon returning home and having made my free book decision, I was vacillating between an OCaml book and the famous Haskell one. I've done a little Haskell in the past but have never touched OCaml, so I was pretty tempted.

However, something amazing happened next. I stumbled upon a page that was comparing OCaml and Haskell, which led to another page... where Haskell prefix notation was mentioned. I know many Haskellers who might read this would shrug, or say "yeah, we know", but this was quite a delightful little discovery for me :-)

I don't remember the first page I found, but since then, I've come across a couple more resources:
That's pretty much it, though. (But please let me know if you know of or find any other resources!)

As such, I needed to do a lot more exploration. Initially, I was really excited and thought I'd be able to convert all Haskell forms to s-expressions (imports, lets, etc.), but I quickly found this was not the case. But the stuff that did work is pretty cool, and I saved it in a series of gists for your viewing pleasure :-)

Addition

The first test was pretty simple. Finding success, I thought I'd try something I do when using a Lisp/Scheme interpreter as a calculator. As you can see below, that didn't work (the full traceback is elided). Searching on Hoogλe got me to the answer I was looking for, though. Off to a good start:

New Advogato Features

New HTML Parser: The long-awaited libxml2 based HTML parser code is live. It needs further work but already handles most markup better than the original parser.

Keep up with the latest Advogato features by reading the Advogato status blog.

If you're a C programmer with some spare time, take a look at the mod_virgule project page and help us with one of the tasks on the ToDo list!