29 Jan 2003 mbp   » (Master)

l.c.a

linux.conf.au was great. I particularly liked Rusty's kernel overview and Willy's talk -- it's good to keep up to date with softirqs and similar things happening in the kernel, even if I don't normally work there. Telsa's talk about debugging was pretty interesting too, though I cringed at some of the dumb things some projects do. My distcc talk was well received. More geeks need to learn to make eye contact while they're talking. The next LCA is in Adelaide in Jan 2004; it's well on it's way to becoming one of the big few conferences.

"black panther on 'roids with a love affair of genocidal dictators" [1].

I've been called many things, but never before something so hilarious. Really, criticizing our resident neoconservative would be superfluous -- his work speaks for itself.

Nevertheless, the essay Anti-Europeanism in America is an intelligent look at the phenomenon. (mglazer seems to think that it is a book rather than an editorial in a publication that happens to be called "NY Review of Books." Be glad you didn't make that embarassing mistake in a graded assignment. :-)

If I was going to pick out just a few passages, it would be these:

Robert Kagan argues that Europe has moved into a Kantian world of "laws and rules and transnational negotiation and cooperation," while the United States remains in a Hobbesian world where military power is still the key to achieving international goals (even liberal ones).[...]

[...] American writers should, but often don't, distinguish between legitimate, informed European criticism of the Bush administration and anti-Americanism, or between legitimate, informed European criticism of the Sharon government and anti-Semitism.

I wish mglazer would get his head around that second one and cut out the "anti-semitism" trollery.

you are here

On a related note, I listened to Bush's State of the Union on BBC World at lunch time. I suppose to be fair non-American ears have to edit out all the religious references, which seem to be obligatory in US politics. I'm not sure how I feel about it overall. He has a good speechwriter.

One interesting thing was his use term "American Coalition" -- it seems to have condensed out of the earlier, somewhat clumsy "American-led Coalition". (Does the new one imply ownership? And can you have a coalition of one?) It strikes me as quite a nice and handy term for the current political power structure, parallel to "Roman Empire" or "British Commonwealth". Practically everyone reading this lives in the entity called the American Coalition, or at least on the margins of it.

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