30 Mar 2014 joey   » (Master)

propellor

Whups, I seem to have built a configuration management system this evening!

Propellor has similar goals to chef or puppet or ansible, but with an approach much more like slaughter. Except it's configured by writing Haskell code.

The name is because propellor ensures that a system is configured with the desired PROPerties, and also because it kind of pulls system configuration along after it. And you may not want to stand too close.

Disclaimer: I'm not really a sysadmin, except for on the scale of "diffuse administration of every Debian machine on planet earth or nearby", and so I don't really understand configuration management. (Well, I did write debconf, which claims to be the "Debian Configuration Management system".. But I didn't understand configuration management back then either.)

So, propellor makes some perhaps wacky choices. The least of these is that it's built from a git repository that any (theoretical) other users will fork and modify; a cron job can re-make it from time to time and pull down configuration changes, or something can be run to push changes.

A really simple configuration for a Tor bridge server using propellor looks something like this:

main = ensureProperties
    [ Apt.stdSourcesList Apt.Stable `onChange` Apt.upgrade
    , Apt.removed ["exim4"] `onChange` Apt.autoRemove
    , Hostname.set "bridget"
    , Ssh.uniqueHostKeys
    , Tor.isBridge
    ]

Since it's just haskell code, it's "easy" to refactor out common configurations for classes of servers, etc. Or perhaps integrate reclass? I don't know. I'm happy with just pure functions and type-safe refactorings of my configs, I think.

Properties are also written in Haskell of course. This one ensures that all the packages in a list are installed.

installed :: [Package] -> Property
installed ps = check (isInstallable ps) go
  where
        go = runApt $ [Param "-y", Param "install"] ++ map Param ps

Here's one that ensures the hostname is set to the desired value, which shows how to specify content for a file, and also how to run another action if a change needed to be made to satisfy a property.

set :: HostName -> Property
set hostname = fileHasContent "/etc/hostname" [hostname]
        `onChange` cmdProperty "hostname" [Param hostname]

Here's part of a custom one that I use to check out a user's home directory from git. Shows how to make a property require that some other property is satisfied first, and how to test if a property has already been satisfied.

installedFor :: UserName -> Property
installedFor user = check (not <$> hasGitDir user) $
        IOProperty ("githome " ++ user) (go =<< homedir user)
                    `requires` Apt.installed ["git", "myrepos"]
  where
    go ... -- 12 lines elided

I'm about 37% happy with the overall approach to listing properties and combining properties into larger properties etc. I think that some unifying insight is missing -- perhaps there should be a Property monad? But as long as it yields a list of properties, any smarter thing should be able to be built on top of this.

Propellor is 564 lines of code, including 25 or so built-in properties like the examples above. It took around 4 hours to build.

I'm pretty sure it was easier to write it than it would have been to look into ansible and salt and slaughter (and also liw's human-readable configuration language whose name I've forgotten) in enough detail to pick one, and learn how its configuration worked, and warp it into something close to how I wanted this to work.

I think that's interesting.. It's partly about NIH and I-want-everything-in-Haskell, but it's also about a complicated system that is a lot of things to a lot of people -- of the kind I see when I look at ansible -- vs the tools and experience to build just the thing you want without the cruft. Nice to have the latter!

Syndicated 2014-03-30 07:51:59 from see shy jo

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