2 Sep 2010 jds   » (Journeyer)

multichannel analog encryption:

it's analog because it requires two people. although they use digital technology, the critical switch from channel to channel is always done by a person who trusts the other person will be able to detect the switch and continue the conversation on the new channel.

a man uses zero or more personal communication devices each of which enables realtime exchange of digital information, such as a pager, a radio, a cellphone, email, telnet, ssh, and many other ways to communicate electronically.

part of the conversation is conveyed in one channel, and part of the conversation is conveyed in another. The switch between channels is initiated by one person and detected by another person.

The more people do this, the more our encrypted messages will be indecipherable to anyone except the intended target. This is because the resources required to record, analyze, and act upon information becomes exponentially more expensive with each additional channel. A wiretap is less compelling in court if it only contains 10 percent of the conversation which is spread across nine other channels, none of which are available.

The more people do this, the more difficult it is for ANY oppressors to abridge our rights to freedom of speech.

When you're ready to join, just start using multichannel analog encryption with your friends until you're good at it.

Here's an example:

email: how are you?

chat response: i'm excited! I discovered a really cool and simple way to encrypt ordinary conversations.

sms: great news. how easy is it to break?

cellphone: it's less easy to break the more people use it. do you want to go to lunch?

facebook chat: sure, now would be a great time to take a break.

twitter: It'S 2:48! I forgot to eat lunch. Leaving now.

A well-crafted conversation on classified subjects could be conveyed just as easily as this trivial lunch example. Feel free to use this technique to encrypt whenever you need just one more layer of security.

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