12 Dec 2011 jas   » (Master)

Small syslog server

My home network has several devices that do not have large persistent storage to keep log files. For example, my wireless routers based on OpenWRT doesn’t log to the limited local storage it has, and a Flukso energy metering device log power readings to a ramdisk. These devices log a fair amount of information that I ideally would like to keep for later analysis. I have never before seen a need to setup a syslogd server, thinking that storing logs locally and keeping regular backups of the machine is good enough. However, it appears like this situation calls for a syslogd server. I found an old NSLU2 in my drawer and installed Debian Squeeze on it following Martin Michlmayr’s instructions. I’m using a 4GB USB memory stick for storage, which should hold plenty of log data. I keep backups of the machine in case the USB memory stick wears out.

After customizing the installation to my preferences (disable ssh passwords, disable portmap/rpc.statd/exim4, installing etckeeper, emacs23-nox, etc) I am ready to configure Rsyslog. I found what looked like the perfect configuration example, “Storing messages from a remote system into a specific file”, but it requires me to hard code a bit too much information in the configuration file for my taste. Instead, I found the DynFile concept. With a file /etc/rsyslogd.d/logger.conf as below I can point any new device to my log server and it will automatically create a new file for it. And since the dates are embedded into the filename, I get log rotation suitable for rsync-style backups for free.

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514

$ModLoad imtcp
$InputTCPServerRun 514

$template DynFile,”/var/log/network-%HOSTNAME%-%$year%-%$month%-%$day%.log”
:fromhost-ip, !isequal, “127.0.0.1″ ?DynFile
:fromhost-ip, !isequal, “127.0.0.1″ ~

flattr this!

Syndicated 2011-12-12 11:19:45 from Simon Josefsson's blog

Latest blog entries     Older blog entries

New Advogato Features

New HTML Parser: The long-awaited libxml2 based HTML parser code is live. It needs further work but already handles most markup better than the original parser.

Keep up with the latest Advogato features by reading the Advogato status blog.

If you're a C programmer with some spare time, take a look at the mod_virgule project page and help us with one of the tasks on the ToDo list!