jas is currently certified at Master level.

Name: Simon Josefsson
Member since: 2001-08-12 00:08:06
Last Login: 2012-09-17 06:53:14

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Homepage: http://josefsson.org/

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Replicant 4.2 0003 on I9300

The Replicant project released version 4.2 0003 recently. I have been using Replicant on a Samsung SIII (I9300) for around 14 months now. Since I have blogged about issues with NFC and Wifi earlier, I wanted to give a status update after upgrading to 0003. I’m happy to report that my NFC issue has been resolved in 0003 (the way I suggested; reverting the patch). My issues with Wifi has been improved in 0003, with my merge request being accepted. What follows below is a standalone explanation of what works and what doesn’t, as a superset of similar things discussed in my earlier blog posts.

What works out of the box: Audio, Telephony, SMS, Data (GSM/3G), Back Camera, NFC. 2D Graphics is somewhat slow compared to stock ROM, but I’m using it daily and can live with that so it isn’t too onerus. Stability is fine, similar to other Android device I’m used to. Video playback does not work (due to non-free media decoders?), which is not a serious problem for me but still likely the biggest outstanding issue except for freedom concerns. 3D graphics apparently doesn’t work, and I believe it is what prevents Firefox from working properly (it crashes). I’m having one annoying but strange problem with telephony: when calling one person I get scrambled audio around 75% of the time. I can still hear what the other person is saying, but can barely make anything out of it. This only happens over 3G, so my workaround when calling that person is to switch to 2G before and switch back after. I talk with plenty other people, and have never had this problem with anyone else, and it has never happened when she talks with anyone else but me. If anyone has suggestion on how to debug this, I’m all ears.

Important apps to get through daily life for me includes K9Mail (email), DAVDroid (for ownCloud CalDav/CardDAV), CalDav Sync Adapter (for Google Calendars), Conversations (XMPP/Jabber chat), FDroid (for apps), ownCloud (auto-uploading my photos), SMS Backup+, Xabber (different XMPP/Jabber accounts), Yubico Authenticator, MuPDF and oandbackup. A couple of other apps I find useful are AdAway (remove web ads), AndStatus, Calendar Widget, NewsBlur and ownCloud News Reader (RSS readers), Tinfoil for Facebook, Twidere (I find its UI somewhat nicer than AndStatus’s), and c:geo.

A number of things requires non-free components. As I discussed in my initial writeup from when I started using Replicant I don’t like this, but I’m accepting it temporarily. The list of issues that can be fixed by adding non-free components include the front camera, Bluetooth, GPS, and Wifi. After flashing the Replicant ROM image that I built (using the fine build instructions), I’m using the following script to add the missing non-free files from Cyanogenmod.

# Download Cyanogenmod 10.1.3 (Android 4.2-based) binaries:
# wget http://download.cyanogenmod.org/get/jenkins/42508/cm-10.1.3-i9300.zip
# echo "073a464a9f5129c490502c77374495c38a25ba790c10e27f51b43845baeba6bf  cm-10.1.3-i9300.zip" | sha256sum -c 
# unzip cm-10.1.3-i9300.zip

adb root
adb remount
adb shell mkdir /system/vendor/firmware
adb shell chmod 755 /system/vendor/firmware

# Front Camera
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/vendor/firmware/fimc_is_fw.bin /system/vendor/firmware/fimc_is_fw.bin
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/vendor/firmware/setfile.bin /system/vendor/firmware/setfile.bin
adb shell chmod 644 /system/vendor/firmware/fimc_is_fw.bin /system/vendor/firmware/setfile.bin

# Bluetooth
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/bin/bcm4334.hcd /system/vendor/firmware/
adb shell chmod 644 /system/vendor/firmware/bcm4334*.hcd

# GPS
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/bin/gpsd /system/bin/gpsd
adb shell chmod 755 /system/bin/gpsd
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/lib/hw/gps.exynos4.so /system/lib/hw/gps.exynos4.so
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/lib/libsecril-client.so /system/lib/libsecril-client.so
adb shell chmod 644 /system/lib/hw/gps.exynos4.so /system/lib/libsecril-client.so

# Wifi
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_apsta.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_apsta.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_murata /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_murata_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_semcosh /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_murata /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_murata_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_semcosh /system/vendor/firmware/

I hope this helps others switch to a better phone environment!

Syndicated 2015-01-13 23:17:28 from Simon Josefsson's blog

OpenPGP Smartcards and GNOME

The combination of GnuPG and a OpenPGP smartcard (such as the YubiKey NEO) has been implemented and working well for a around a decade. I recall starting to use it when I received a FSFE Fellowship card long time ago. Sadly there has been some regressions when using them under GNOME recently. I reinstalled my laptop with Debian Jessie (beta2) recently, and now took the time to work through the issue and write down a workaround.

To work with GnuPG and smartcards you install GnuPG agent, scdaemon, pscsd and pcsc-tools. On Debian you can do it like this:

apt-get install gnupg-agent scdaemon pcscd pcsc-tools

Use the pcsc_scan command line tool to make sure pcscd recognize the smartcard before continuing, if that doesn’t recognize the smartcard nothing beyond this point will work. The next step is to make sure you have the following line in ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf:

use-agent

Logging out and into GNOME should start gpg-agent for you, through the /etc/X11/Xsession.d/90gpg-agent script. In theory, this should be all that is required. However, when you start a terminal and attempt to use the smartcard through GnuPG you would get an error like this:

jas@latte:~$ gpg --card-status
gpg: selecting openpgp failed: unknown command
gpg: OpenPGP card not available: general error
jas@latte:~$

The reason is that the GNOME Keyring hijacks the GnuPG agent’s environment variables and effectively replaces gpg-agent with gnome-keyring-daemon which does not support smartcard commands (Debian bug #773304). GnuPG uses the environment variable GPG_AGENT_INFO to find the location of the agent socket, and when the GNOME Keyring is active it will typically look like this:

jas@latte:~$ echo $GPG_AGENT_INFO 
/run/user/1000/keyring/gpg:0:1
jas@latte:~$ 

If you use GnuPG with a smartcard, I recommend to disable GNOME Keyring’s GnuPG and SSH agent emulation code. This used to be easy to achieve in older GNOME releases (e.g., the one included in Debian Wheezy), through the gnome-session-properties GUI. Sadly there is no longer any GUI for disabling this functionality (Debian bug #760102). The GNOME Keyring GnuPG/SSH agent replacement functionality is invoked through the XDG autostart mechanism, and the documented way to disable system-wide services for a normal user account is to invoke the following commands.

jas@latte:~$ mkdir ~/.config/autostart
jas@latte:~$ cp /etc/xdg/autostart/gnome-keyring-gpg.desktop ~/.config/autostart/
jas@latte:~$ echo 'Hidden=true' >> ~/.config/autostart/gnome-keyring-gpg.desktop 
jas@latte:~$ cp /etc/xdg/autostart/gnome-keyring-ssh.desktop ~/.config/autostart/
jas@latte:~$ echo 'Hidden=true' >> ~/.config/autostart/gnome-keyring-ssh.desktop 
jas@latte:~$ 

You now need to logout and login again. When you start a terminal, you can look at the GPG_AGENT_INFO environment variable again and everything should be working again.

jas@latte:~$ echo $GPG_AGENT_INFO 
/tmp/gpg-dqR4L7/S.gpg-agent:1890:1
jas@latte:~$ echo $SSH_AUTH_SOCK 
/tmp/gpg-54VfLs/S.gpg-agent.ssh
jas@latte:~$ gpg --card-status
Application ID ...: D2760001240102000060000000420000
...
jas@latte:~$ ssh-add -L
ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1yc2EAAAADAQABAAABAQDFP+UOTZJ+OXydpmbKmdGOVoJJz8se7lMs139T+TNLryk3EEWF+GqbB4VgzxzrGjwAMSjeQkAMb7Sbn+VpbJf1JDPFBHoYJQmg6CX4kFRaGZT6DHbYjgia59WkdkEYTtB7KPkbFWleo/RZT2u3f8eTedrP7dhSX0azN0lDuu/wBrwedzSV+AiPr10rQaCTp1V8sKbhz5ryOXHQW0Gcps6JraRzMW+ooKFX3lPq0pZa7qL9F6sE4sDFvtOdbRJoZS1b88aZrENGx8KSrcMzARq9UBn1plsEG4/3BRv/BgHHaF+d97by52R0VVyIXpLlkdp1Uk4D9cQptgaH4UAyI1vr cardno:006000000042
jas@latte:~$ 

That’s it. Resolving this properly involves 1) adding smartcard code to the GNOME Keyring, 2) disabling the GnuPG/SSH replacement code in GNOME Keyring completely, 3) reorder the startup so that gpg-agent supersedes gnome-keyring-daemon instead of vice versa, so that people who installed the gpg-agent really gets it instead of the GNOME default, or 4) something else. I don’t have a strong opinion on how to solve this, but 3) sounds like a simple way forward.

Syndicated 2015-01-02 20:46:40 from Simon Josefsson's blog

Dice Random Numbers

Generating data with entropy, or random number generation (RNG), is a well-known difficult problem. Many crypto algorithms and protocols assumes random data is available. There are many implementations out there, including /dev/random in the BSD and Linux kernels and API calls in crypto libraries such as GnuTLS or OpenSSL. How they work can be understood by reading the source code. The quality of the data depends on actual hardware and what entropy sources were available — the RNG implementation itself is deterministic, it merely convert data with supposed entropy from a set of data sources and then generate an output stream.

In some situations, like on virtualized environments or on small embedded systems, it is hard to find sources of sufficient quantity. Rarely are there any lower-bound estimates on how much entropy there is in the data you get. You can improve the RNG issue by using a separate hardware RNG, but there is deployment complexity in that, and from a theoretical point of view, the problem of trusting that you get good random data merely moved from one system to another. (There is more to say about hardware RNGs, I’ll save that for another day.)

For some purposes, the available solutions does not inspire enough confidence in me because of the high complexity. Complexity is often the enemy of security. In crypto discussions I have said, only half-jokingly, that about the only RNG process that I would trust is one that I can explain in simple words and implement myself with the help of pen and paper. Normally I use the example of rolling a normal six-sided dice (a D6) several times. I have been thinking about this process in more detail lately, and felt it was time to write it down, regardless of how silly it may seem.

A dice with six sides produces a random number between 1 and 6. It is relatively straight forward to intuitively convinced yourself that it is not clearly biased: inspect that it looks symmetric and do some trial rolls. By repeatedly rolling the dice, you can generate how much data you need, time permitting.

I do not understand enough thermodynamics physics to know how to estimate the amount of entropy of a physical process, so I need to resort to intuitive arguments. It would be easy to just assume that a dice produces 3 bits of entropy, because 2^3=6 which matches the number of possible outcomes. At least I find it easy to convince myself that 3 bits is the upper bound. I suspect that most dice have some form of defect, though, which leads to a very small bias that could be found with a large number of rolls. Thus I would propose that the amount of entropy of most D6’s are slightly below 3 bits on average. Further, to establish a lower bound, and intuitively, it seems easy to believe that if the entropy of particular D6 would be closer to 2 bits than to 3 bits, this would be noticeable fairly quickly by trial rolls. That assumes the dice does not have complex logic and machinery in it that would hide the patterns. With the tinfoil hat on, consider a dice with a power source and mechanics in it that allowed it to decide which number it would land on: it could generate seamingly-looking random pattern that still contained 0 bits of entropy. For example, suppose a D6 is built to produce the pattern 4, 1, 4, 2, 1, 3, 5, 6, 2, 3, 1, 3, 6, 3, 5, 6, 4, … this would mean it produces 0 bits of entropy (compare the numbers with the decimals of sqrt(2)). Other factors may also influence the amount of entropy in the output, consider if you roll the dice by just dropping straight down from 1cm/1inch above the table. With this discussion as background, and for simplicity, going forward, I will assume that my D6 produces 3 bits of entropy on every roll.

We need to figure out how many times we need to roll it. I usually find myself needing a 128-bit random number (16 bytes). Crypto algorithms and protocols typically use power-of-2 data sizes. 64 bits of entropy results in brute-force attacks requiring about 2^64 tests, and for many operations, this is feasible with today’s computing power. Performing 2^128 operations does not seem possible with today’s technology. To produce 128 bits of entropy using a D6 that produces 3 bits of entropy per roll, you need to perform ceil(128/3)=43 rolls.

We also need to design an algorithm to convert the D6 output into the resulting 128-bit random number. While it would be nice from a theoretical point of view to let each and every bit of the D6 output influence each and every bit of the 128-bit random number, this becomes difficult to do with pen and paper. For simplicity, my process will be to write the binary representation of the D6 output on paper in 3-bit chunks and then read it up as 8-bit chunks. After 8 rolls, there are 24 bits available, which can be read up as 3 distinct 8-bit numbers. So let’s do this for the D6 outputs of 3, 6, 1, 1, 2, 5, 4, 1:

3   6   1   1   2   5   4   1
011 111 001 001 010 101 010 001
01111100 10010101 01010001
124 0x7C 149 0x95 81 0x51

After 8 rolls, we have generated the 3 byte hex string “7C9551″. I repeat the process 5 more times, concatenating the strings, resulting in a hex string with 15 bytes of data. To get the last byte, I only need to roll the D6 three more times, where the two high bits of the last roll is used and the lowest bit is discarded. Let’s say the last D6 outputs were 4, 2, 3, this would result in:

4   2   3
100 010 011
10001001
137 0x89

So the 16 bytes of random data is “7C9551..89″ with “..” replaced by the 5 pieces of 3-byte chunks of data.

So what’s the next step? Depends on what you want to use the random data for. For some purposes, such as generating a high-quality 128-bit AES key, I would be done. The key is right there. To generate a high-quality ECC private key, you need to generate somewhat more randomness (matching the ECC curve size) and do a couple of EC operations. To generate a high-quality RSA private key, unfortunately you will need much more randomness, at the point where it makes more sense to implement a PRNG seeded with a strong 128-bit seed generated using this process. The latter approach is the general solution: generate 128 bits of data using the dice approach, and then seed a CSPRNG of your choice to get large number of data quickly. These steps are somewhat technical, and you lose the pen-and-paper properties, but code to implement these parts are easier to verify compared to verifying that you get good quality entropy out of your RNG implementation.

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Syndicated 2014-11-11 23:36:02 from Simon Josefsson's blog

The Case for Short OpenPGP Key Validity Periods

After I moved to a new OpenPGP key (see key transition statement) I have received comments about the short life length of my new key. When I created the key (see my GnuPG setup) I set it to expire after 100 days. Some people assumed that I would have to create a new key then, and therefore wondered what value there is to sign a key that will expire in two months. It doesn’t work like that, and below I will explain how OpenPGP key expiration works; how to extend the expiration time of your key; and argue why having a relatively short validity period can be a good thing.

The OpenPGP message format has a sub-packet called the Key Expiration Time, quoting the RFC:

5.2.3.6. Key Expiration Time

   (4-octet time field)

   The validity period of the key.  This is the number of seconds after
   the key creation time that the key expires.  If this is not present
   or has a value of zero, the key never expires.  This is found only on
   a self-signature.

You can print the sub-packets in your OpenPGP key with gpg --list-packets. See below an output for my key, and notice the “created 1403464490″ (which is Unix time for 2014-06-22 21:14:50) and the “subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 100d0h0m)” which adds up to an expiration on 2014-09-26. Don’t confuse the creation time of the key (“created 1403464321″) with when the signature was created (“created 1403464490″).

jas@latte:~$ gpg --export 54265e8c | gpg --list-packets |head -20
:public key packet:
	version 4, algo 1, created 1403464321, expires 0
	pkey[0]: [3744 bits]
	pkey[1]: [17 bits]
:user ID packet: "Simon Josefsson "
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid 0664A76954265E8C
	version 4, created 1403464490, md5len 0, sigclass 0x13
	digest algo 10, begin of digest be 8e
	hashed subpkt 27 len 1 (key flags: 03)
	hashed subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 100d0h0m)
	hashed subpkt 11 len 7 (pref-sym-algos: 9 8 7 13 12 11 10)
	hashed subpkt 21 len 4 (pref-hash-algos: 10 9 8 11)
	hashed subpkt 30 len 1 (features: 01)
	hashed subpkt 23 len 1 (key server preferences: 80)
	hashed subpkt 2 len 4 (sig created 2014-06-22)
	hashed subpkt 25 len 1 (primary user ID)
	subpkt 16 len 8 (issuer key ID 0664A76954265E8C)
	data: [3743 bits]
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid EDA21E94B565716F
	version 4, created 1403466403, md5len 0, sigclass 0x10
jas@latte:~$ 

So the key will simply stop being valid after that time? No. It is possible to update the key expiration time value, re-sign the key, and distribute the key to people you communicate with directly or indirectly to OpenPGP keyservers. Since that date is a couple of weeks away, now felt like the perfect opportunity to go through the exercise of taking out my offline master key and boot from a Debian LiveCD and extend its expiry time. See my earlier writeup for LiveCD and USB stick conventions.

user@debian:~$ export GNUPGHOME=/media/FA21-AE97/gnupghome
user@debian:~$ gpg --edit-key 54265e8c
gpg (GnuPG) 1.4.12; Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Secret key is available.

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for the primary key.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:47:48 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 1

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub* 2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for a subkey.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:48:05 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub* 2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 2

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub* 2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 1

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for a subkey.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:48:14 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub  2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 3

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub* 2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub* 2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> key 2

pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub* 2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2014-09-30  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> expire
Changing expiration time for a subkey.
Please specify how long the key should be valid.
         0 = key does not expire
        = key expires in n days
      w = key expires in n weeks
      m = key expires in n months
      y = key expires in n years
Key is valid for? (0) 150
Key expires at Fri 23 Jan 2015 02:48:23 PM UTC
Is this correct? (y/N) y

You need a passphrase to unlock the secret key for
user: "Simon Josefsson "
3744-bit RSA key, ID 54265E8C, created 2014-06-22


pub  3744R/54265E8C  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: SC  
                     trust: ultimate      validity: ultimate
sub  2048R/32F8119D  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: S   
sub  2048R/78ECD86B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: E   
sub* 2048R/36BA8F9B  created: 2014-06-22  expires: 2015-01-23  usage: A   
[ultimate] (1). Simon Josefsson 
[ultimate] (2)  Simon Josefsson 

gpg> save
user@debian:~$ gpg -a --export 54265e8c > /media/KINGSTON/updated-key.txt
user@debian:~$ 

I remove the “transport” USB stick from the “offline” computer, and back on my laptop I can inspect the new updated key. Let’s use the same command as before. The key creation time is the same (“created 1403464321″), of course, but the signature packet has a new time (“created 1409064478″) since it was signed now. Notice “created 1409064478″ and “subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 214d19h35m)”. The expiration time is computed based on when the key was generated, not when the signature packet was generated. You may want to double-check the pref-sym-algos, pref-hash-algos and other sub-packets so that you don’t accidentally change anything else. (Btw, re-signing your key is also how you would modify those preferences over time.)

jas@latte:~$ cat /media/KINGSTON/updated-key.txt |gpg --list-packets | head -20
:public key packet:
	version 4, algo 1, created 1403464321, expires 0
	pkey[0]: [3744 bits]
	pkey[1]: [17 bits]
:user ID packet: "Simon Josefsson "
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid 0664A76954265E8C
	version 4, created 1409064478, md5len 0, sigclass 0x13
	digest algo 10, begin of digest 5c b2
	hashed subpkt 27 len 1 (key flags: 03)
	hashed subpkt 11 len 7 (pref-sym-algos: 9 8 7 13 12 11 10)
	hashed subpkt 21 len 4 (pref-hash-algos: 10 9 8 11)
	hashed subpkt 30 len 1 (features: 01)
	hashed subpkt 23 len 1 (key server preferences: 80)
	hashed subpkt 25 len 1 (primary user ID)
	hashed subpkt 2 len 4 (sig created 2014-08-26)
	hashed subpkt 9 len 4 (key expires after 214d19h35m)
	subpkt 16 len 8 (issuer key ID 0664A76954265E8C)
	data: [3744 bits]
:user ID packet: "Simon Josefsson "
:signature packet: algo 1, keyid 0664A76954265E8C
jas@latte:~$ 

Being happy with the new key, I import it and send it to key servers out there.

jas@latte:~$ gpg --import /media/KINGSTON/updated-key.txt 
gpg: key 54265E8C: "Simon Josefsson " 5 new signatures
gpg: Total number processed: 1
gpg:         new signatures: 5
jas@latte:~$ gpg --send-keys 54265e8c
gpg: sending key 54265E8C to hkp server keys.gnupg.net
jas@latte:~$ gpg --keyserver keyring.debian.org  --send-keys 54265e8c
gpg: sending key 54265E8C to hkp server keyring.debian.org
jas@latte:~$ 

Finally: why go through this hassle, rather than set the key to expire in 50 years? Some reasons for this are:

  1. I don’t trust myselt to keep track of a private key (or revocation cert) for 50 years.
  2. I want people to notice my revocation certificate as quickly as possible.
  3. I want people to notice other changes to my key (e.g., cipher preferences) as quickly as possible.

Let’s look into the first reason a bit more. What would happen if I lose both the master key and the revocation cert, for a key that’s valid 50 years? I would start from scratch and create a new key that I upload to keyservers. Then there would be two keys out there that are valid and identify me, and both will have a set of signatures on it. None of them will be revoked. If I happen to lose the new key again, there will be three valid keys out there with signatures on it. You may argue that this shouldn’t be a problem, and that nobody should use any other key than the latest one I want to be used, but that’s a technical argument — and at this point we have moved into usability, and that’s a trickier area. Having users select which out of a couple of apparently all valid keys that exist for me is simply not going to work well.

The second is more subtle, but considerably more important. If people retrieve my key from keyservers today, and it expires in 50 years, there will be no need to refresh it from key servers. If for some reason I have to publish my revocation certificate, there will be people that won’t see it. If instead I set a short validity period, people will have to refresh my key once in a while, and will then either get an updated expiration time, or will get the revocation certificate. This amounts to a CRL/OCSP-like model.

The third is similar to the second, but deserves to be mentioned on its own. Because the cipher preferences are expressed (and signed) in my key, and that ciphers come and go, I would expect that I will modify those during the life-time of my long-term key. If I have a long validity period of my key, people would not refresh it from key servers, and would encrypt messages to me with ciphers I may no longer want to be used.

The downside of having a short validity period is that I have to do slightly more work to get out the offline master key once in a while (which I have to once in a while anyway because I’m signing other peoples keys) and that others need to refresh my key from the key servers. Can anyone identify other disadvantages? Also, having to explain why I’m using a short validity period used to be a downside, but with this writeup posted that won’t be the case any more. :-)

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Syndicated 2014-08-26 18:11:27 from Simon Josefsson's blog

Wifi on S3 with Replicant

I’m using Replicant on my main phone. As I’ve written before, I didn’t get Wifi to work. The other day leth in #replicant pointed me towards a CyanogenMod discussion about a similar issue. The fix does indeed work, and allowed me to connect to wifi networks and to setup my phone for Internet sharing. Digging deeper, I found a CM Jira issue about it, and ultimately a code commit. It seems the issue is that more recent S3′s comes with a Murata Wifi chipset that uses MAC addresses not known back in the Android 4.2 (CM-10.1.3 and Replicant-4.2) days. Pulling in the latest fixes for macloader.cpp solves this problem for me, although I still need to load the non-free firmware images that I get from CM-10.1.3. I’ve created a pull request fixing macloader.cpp for Replicant 4.2 if someone else is curious about the details. You have to rebuild your OS with the patch for things to work (if you don’t want to, the workaround using /data/.cid.info works fine), and install some firmware blobs as below.

adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_apsta.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_apsta.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_mfg.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_p2p.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b0 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b1 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/bcmdhd_sta.bin_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_murata /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_murata_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_mfg.txt_semcosh /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_murata /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_murata_b2 /system/vendor/firmware/
adb push cm-10.1.3-i9300/system/etc/wifi/nvram_net.txt_semcosh /system/vendor/firmware/

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Syndicated 2014-08-10 18:02:37 from Simon Josefsson's blog

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