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Name: JAmes Atwill
Member since: N/A
Last Login: 2008-09-25 19:46:06

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Homepage: http://idcmp.linuxstuff.org/

Notes:

Hi There.
Ages ago, before modern search engines, when you searched for IDCMP you got the original meaning of the acronym, which stemmed from the good ole days of the Amiga.

These days, when you search for IDCMP, you find this page; and me. (Sometimes you'll find non-me related things too).
You can find my blog elsewhere. This is just a syndication.

Articles Posted by idcmp

Recent blog entries by idcmp

Syndication: RSS 2.0

Navigation 2.0: The Missing Features

I recently found myself driving a car in an unfamiliar city relying heavily on Google Navigation on my phone to get me from point A to point B (and back to point A again). From this two week experience I found some things in the Navigation experience I'd really love to have. Maybe other Navigation apps have this and I've just been googleblind.

Not Looking At The Phone

Most of the time I'm driving, I'm relying on Navigation to tell me what's going on. You're probably the same. Some simple options would make me a lot more comfortable. These also apply to when I'm on a motorbike and my phone is locked away in a pocket.
  1. Don't tell me compass directions: If I'm in a new city, in a new area telling me "Head East" is useless. Especially at night where I can't use the Sun to figure out which way East is.
  2. Give me a hint which lane I should eventually be in, "Travel three kilometers, eventually turning left."
  3. If I'm driving for thirty minutes on a highway, periodically remind me that you haven't crashed or suddenly run out of battery power. Even a little beep every 10 minutes (or % of a leg) would be nice. Maybe even tell me what % of battery is left.
  4. Along those lines, since Navigation knows how fast I'm going and how far I have to go, telling me "Continue for about 15 minutes." is more handy than "continue for 23 kilometers".
  5. On navigation start, tell me something useful; even "Route calculated" or "Estimated twenty minutes of travel time."
  6. If I'll have less than 10% battery life by the calculated arrival time, tell me this up front and give me the option to just read the list without actual navigation.
  7. It may annoy you, but I like to know when Navigation has changed its mind about where we're going. Telling me that a route has been recalculated is re-assuring.

Tell Me Less

There are some things where being quieter makes more sense:
  1. Cut me some slack in a parking lot. Unless you're going to tell me exactly how to get out of the parking lot, keep quiet until I'm close to an exit. Calculate some routes of the closest few exits and get ready to tell me "Turn left here." or "Turn right here.". Telling me to "Head North to 11th Ave South West going to 23rd Street East going East." is just distracting while I'm trying to navigate the maze of grocery carts and SUVs.
  2. Some cities have Main St. North, West, East, South or North East / North West / etc.  If I'm on "Main St North West" turning onto "1st Street North West", don't say "Northwest" both times.  In fact, unless I'm close to a boundary where it's important to know which cardinal direction of the street I'm on, simply saying "Turn left onto First Street." is fine.

Nicer Touches

And there are a few nice things I bet wouldn't be too hard.
  1. Traffic Lights. I'm sure most cities have a database of which intersections have traffic lights. Telling me "At the lights, turn left onto Third street." trumps "In six hundred and fifty meters turn left onto Third street.".
  2. Let me mark certain areas as "well known" areas and silence turn by turn directions if my destination is in that area unless I ask for them to be re-enabled.
  3. All major highways in Canada have numbered exits. They're numbered based on kilometer distance. If I'm at exit 35, and I'm going to exit 25, I know there's ten kilometers to go. When I get on a highway, let me know the exit number I'm going to be exiting on.
  4. If I'm going to a destination that has a Google Place (or whatever they're called now), and it seems that they'll be closed or closing within an hour of the calculated arrival, give me an option to call the place.
  5. Let me tell Navigation how comfortable I am with a given city or area. If I don't know it very well, give me notifications earlier and take me on possibly longer but easier to navigate routes.


Syndicated 2012-05-24 23:28:00 (Updated 2012-05-24 23:30:54) from Idcmp

New Plugin: licensing-maven-plugin

Ever wanted to know what licenses your dependencies (and their dependencies) are using? Maybe you work for a company that wants to sell their source code so you're wanting to avoid the GPL (and AGPL)? I've got the plugin for you!

I mentioned a while back that the build process at my day job had been declared bankrupt. Well, it's doing much better now; what used to be a multi-day process where you were never quite sure if it was working 100% now takes less than an hour (including data population). We're quite happy about that part.

Along the way we started looking at some of the other bits that fit more into release management; one of them was a "licensing report". This report listed most of our dependencies and which open source license they were in. Instead of hacking at the old scripts, we decided to let Maven take over and handle providing licensing and dependency information.

So with a rough idea of what we wanted to do, I put together the Licensing Maven Plugin. It has a few handy features:

  1. Transitively aggregate licensing information of dependencies of child modules in multi-module reactors (or in English, it works the way you would expect it to on multi-module builds).
  2. Coalesce license names (so "Apache License, Version 2.0", "Apache 2.0" and "ASLv2.0" can all be reported as "The Apache Software License, Version 2.0").
  3. Fail builds if a dependency is only available under a disliked license.
  4. Exempt artifacts under disliked licenses from failing the build.
  5. Manually declare licenses for dependencies that fail to provide their own.


It's hosted on central, so give it a whirl:

mvn org.linuxstuff.maven:licensing-maven-plugin:1.5:aggregate

You'll see a truckload of warnings go by, and when it stops, you'll have a target/aggregated-third-party-licensing.xml file (yes, I know it's not nicely formatted yet).

If you'd like some more details, checkout the licensing-maven-plugin README.


Syndicated 2012-01-09 07:54:00 (Updated 2012-01-09 08:41:16) from Idcmp

New Plugin: licensing-maven-plugin

Ever wanted to know what licenses your dependencies (and their dependencies) are using? Maybe you work for a company that wants to sell their source code so you're wanting to avoid the GPL (and AGPL)? I've got the plugin for you!

I mentioned a while back that the build process at my day job had been declared bankrupt. Well, it's doing much better now; what used to be a multi-day process where you were never quite sure if it was working 100% now takes less than an hour (including data population). We're quite happy about that part.

Along the way we started looking at some of the other bits that fit more into release management; one of them was a "licensing report". This report listed most of our dependencies and which open source license they were in. Instead of hacking at the old scripts, we decided to let Maven take over and handle providing licensing and dependency information.

So with a rough idea of what we wanted to do, I put together the Licensing Maven Plugin. It has a few handy features:

  1. Transitively aggregate licensing information of dependencies of child modules in multi-module reactors (or in English, it works the way you would expect it to on multi-module builds).
  2. Coalesce license names (so "Apache License, Version 2.0", "Apache 2.0" and "ASLv2.0" can all be reported as "The Apache Software License, Version 2.0").
  3. Fail builds if a dependency is only available under a disliked license.
  4. Exempt artifacts under disliked licenses from failing the build.
  5. Manually declare licenses for dependencies that fail to provide their own.


It's hosted on central, so give it a whirl:

## NOTE: If you're reading this early Saturday morning (07-Jan-2012), central may not have synced 1.5 yet.
mvn org.linuxstuff.maven:licensing-maven-plugin:1.5:aggregate


You'll see a truckload of warnings go by, and when it stops, you'll have a target/aggregated-third-party-licensing.xml file (yes, I know it's not nicely formatted yet).

If you'd like some more details, checkout the licensing-maven-plugin README.


Syndicated 2012-01-08 07:54:00 (Updated 2012-01-08 07:56:46) from Idcmp

14 Dec 2011 (updated 17 Dec 2011 at 07:28 UTC) »

Hello Developers, look at your code.

Hello developers, look at your code, now back to me, now back at your code, now back to me. Sadly, your code isn't me, but if it stopped collecting tech debt and you started making time for technical quality it could smell like me. Page down, back up. Where are you? You're at an interface with the code that your code could smell like. What's in your hand, back at me. I have it, it's an oyster with two different implementations to that thing you have an API for. Look again, the implementation is now secure and scalable. Anything is possible when your code has no smells. I'm on a horse.


Syndicated 2011-12-14 09:03:00 (Updated 2011-12-17 07:26:00) from Idcmp

A Patentable Idea

A quick post that if someone were to come up with a "USB Charger Condom" that I could plug into those free charging stations (or into my phone) which acted like an application layer proxy for my phone and prevented the charging station for giving anything more than power and not access anything on my phone that I'd gladly use one, and I'd make everyone I know use one too.



Syndicated 2011-11-01 15:37:00 (Updated 2011-11-01 15:37:05) from Idcmp

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