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Name: Daniel Kahn Gillmor
Member since: 2009-01-05 21:31:28
Last Login: 2009-01-06 19:54:49

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Homepage: http://cmrg.fifthhorseman.net/wiki/dkg

Notes:

I'm a free software developer and technology advisor for activist groups, educational groups, and non-profits. I'm a debian maintainer, and in the queue toward becoming a debian developer (though i have no illusions about that being a speedy process). I contribute to a range of projects, but my focus these days is on sorting out cryptographic infrastructure, and PKI in particular. I'd like to see the global network be a place that encourages end-to-end communication (where people are both producers and consumers of culture, ideas, and tools), rather than a system that traps people into mechanisms of centralized control. Without a reasonable *and* intuitive PKI, the hope of empowering the end user to be in full control of their communication will fade in the face of the power of the entities that control the networks themselves. Because this goal is for wide-spread user adoption, i also have a strong interest in usability, though my skills need work there. Good usability is actually much harder than good cryptography, i think. Some interesting projects that i'm a significant contributor to:

  • monkeysphere, an OpenPGP-based PKI for SSH
  • debirf, a project to run a full debian distribution entirely from RAM
I do minor contributions and security audits on a range of tools, including GnuTLS, Trac and OpenSSH. I maintain about a half-dozen packages for debian. My OpenPGP key is 0xD21739E9 (fingerprint .0EE5 BE97 9282 D80B 9F75 40F1 CCD2 ED94 D217 39E9)

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Cheers to audacity!

When paultag recently announced a project to try to move debian infrastructure to python3, my first thought was how large that undertaking would likely be. It seems like a classic engineering task, full of work and nit-picky details to get right, useful/necessary in the long-term, painful in the short-term, and if you manage to pull it off successfully, the best you can usually hope for is that no one will notice that it was done at all.

I always find that kind of task a little off-putting and difficult to tackle, but I was happy to see someone driving the project, since it does need to get done. Debian is potentially also in a position to help the upstream python community, because we have a pretty good view of what things are being used, at least within our own ecosystem.

I'm happy to say that i also missed one of the other great benefits of paultag's audacious proposal, which is how it has engaged people who already knew about debian but who aren't yet involved. Evidence of this engagement is already visible on the py3porters-devel mailing list. But if that wasn't enough, I ran into a friend recently who told me, "Hey, I found a way to contribute to debian finally!" and pointed me to the py3-porters project. People want to contribute to the project, and are looking for ways in.

So cheers to the people who propose audacious projects and make them inviting to everyone, newcomers included. And cheers to the people who step up to potentially daunting work, stake out a task, roll up their sleeves, and pitch in. Even if the py3porters project doesn't move all of debian's python infrastructure to pyt3 as fast as paultag wants it to, i think it's already a win for the project as a whole. I am looking forward to seeing what comes out of it (and it's reminding me i need to port some of my own python work, too!)

The next time you stumble over something big that needs doing in debian, even something that might seem impossible, please make it inviting, and dive in. The rest of the project will grow and improve from the attempt.

Tags: py3-porters

Syndicated 2015-05-08 18:43:00 from Weblogs for dkg

Preferred Packaging Practices

I just took a few minutes to write up my preferred Debian packaging practices.

The basic jist is that i like to use git-buildpackage (gbp) with the upstream source included in the repo, both as tarballs (with pristine-tar branches) and including upstream's native VCS history (Joey's arguments about syncing with upstream git are worth reading if you're not already convinced this is a good idea).

I also started using gbp-pq recently -- the patch-queue feature is really useful for at least three things:

  • rebasing your debian/patches/ files when a new version comes out upstream -- you can use all your normal git rebase habits! and
  • facilitating sending patches upstream, hopefully reducing the divergence, and
  • cherry-picking new as-yet-unreleased upstream bugfix patches into a debian release.

My preferred packaging practices document is a work in progress. I'd love to improve it. If you have suggestions, please let me know.

Also, if you've written up your own preferred packaging practices, send me a link! I'm hoping to share and learn tips and tricks around this kind of workflow at debconf 15 this year.

Syndicated 2015-05-01 19:41:00 from Weblogs for dkg

Bootable grub USB stick (EFI and BIOS for Intel)

I'm using grub version 2.02~beta2-2.

I want to make a USB stick that's capable of booting Intel architecture EFI machines, both 64-bit (x86_64) and 32-bit (ia32). I'm starting from a USB stick which is attached to a running debian system as /dev/sdX. I have nothing that i care about on that USB stick, and all data on it will be destroyed by this process.

I'm also going to try to make it bootable for traditional Intel BIOS machines, since that seems handy.

I'm documenting what I did here, in case it's useful to other people.

Set up the USB stick's partition table:

parted /dev/sdX -- mktable gpt
parted /dev/sdX -- mkpart biosgrub fat32 1MiB 4MiB
parted /dev/sdX -- mkpart efi fat32 4MiB -1
parted /dev/sdX -- set 1 bios_grub on
parted /dev/sdX -- set 2 esp on
After this, my 1GiB USB stick looks like:
0 root@foo:~# parted /dev/sdX -- print
Model:  USB FLASH DRIVE (scsi)
Disk /dev/sdX: 1032MB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: gpt
Disk Flags: 

Number  Start   End     Size    File system  Name      Flags
 1      1049kB  4194kB  3146kB  fat32        biosgrub  bios_grub
 2      4194kB  1031MB  1027MB               efi       boot, esp

0 root@foo:~# 
make a filesystem and mount it temporarily at /mnt:
mkfs -t vfat -n GRUB /dev/sdX2
mount /dev/sdX2 /mnt
ensure we have the binaries needed, and add three grub targets for the different platforms:
apt install grub-efi-ia32-bin grub-efi-amd64-bin grub-pc-bin grub2-common

grub-install --removable --no-nvram --no-uefi-secure-boot \
     --efi-directory=/mnt --boot-directory=/mnt \
     --target=i386-efi

grub-install --removable --no-nvram --no-uefi-secure-boot \
     --efi-directory=/mnt --boot-directory=/mnt \
     --target=x86_64-efi

grub-install --removable --boot-directory=/mnt \
     --target=i386-pc /dev/sdX
At this point, you should add anything else you want to /mnt here! For example: And don't forget to cleanup:
umount /mnt
sync

Tags: bios, efi, grub, tip

Syndicated 2015-03-16 23:12:00 from Weblogs for dkg

a10n for l10n

The abbreviated title above means "Appreciation for Localization" :)

I wanted to say a word of thanks for the awesome work done by debian localization teams. I speak English, and my other language skills are weak. I'm lucky: most software I use is written by default in a language that I can already understand.

The debian localization teams do great work in making sure that packages in debian gets translated into many other languages, so that many more people around the world can take advantage of free software.

I was reminded of this work recently (again) with the great patches submitted to GnuPG and related packages. The changes were made by many different people, and coordinated with the debian GnuPG packaging team by David Prévot.

This work doesn't just help debian and its users. These localizations make their way back upstream to the original projects, which in turn are available to many other people.

If you use debian, and you speak a language other than english, and you want to give back to the community, please consider joining one of the localization teams. They are a great way to help out our project's top priorities: our users and free software.

Thank you to all the localizers!

(this post was inspired by gregoa's debian advent calendar. i won't be posting public words of thanks as frequently or as diligently as he does, any more than i'll be fixing the number of RC bugs that he fixes. This are just two of the ways that gregoa consistently leads the community by example. He's an inspiration, even if living up to his example is a daunting challenge.)

Syndicated 2014-12-12 23:00:00 from Weblogs for dkg

GnuPG 2.1.0 in debian experimental

Today, i uploaded GnuPG 2.1.0 into debian's experimental suite. It's built for amd64 and i386 and powerpc already. You can monitor its progress on the buildds to see when it's available for your architecture.

Changes

GnuPG 2.1 offers many new and interesting features, but one of the most important changes is the introduction of elliptic curve crypto (ECC). While GnuPG 2.1 discourages the creation of ECC keys by default, it's important that we have the ability to verify ECC signatures and to encrypt to ECC keys if other people are using this tech. It seems likely, for example, that Google's End-To-End Chrome OpenPGP extension will use ECC. Users who don't have this capability available won't be able to communicate with End-To-End users.

There are many other architectural changes, including a move to more daemonized interactions with the outside world, including using dirmngr to talk to the keyservers, and relying more heavily on gpg-agent for secret key access. The gpg-agent change is a welcome one -- the agent now holds the secret key material entirely and never releases it -- as of 2.1 gpg2 never has any asymmetric secret key material in its process space at all.

One other nice change for those of us with large keyrings is the new keybox format for public key material. This provides much faster indexed access to the public keyring.

I've been using GnuPG 2.1.0 betas regularly for the last month, and i think that for the most part, they're ready for regular use.

Timing for debian

The timing between the debian freeze and the GnuPG upstream is unfortunate, but i don't think i'm prepared to push for this as a jessie transition yet, without more backup. I'm talking to other members of the GnuPG packaging team to see if they think this is worth even bringing to the attention of the release team, but i'm not pursuing it at the moment.

If you really want to see this in debian jessie, please install the experimental package and let me know how it works for you.

Long term migration concerns

GnuPG upstream is now maintaining three branches concurrently: modern (2.1.x), stable (2.0.x), and classic (1.4.x). I think this is stretches the GnuPG upstream development team too thin, and we should do what we can to help them transition to supporting fewer releases concurrently.

In the long-term, I'd ultimately like to see gnupg 2.1.x to replace all use of gpg 1.4.x and gpg 2.0.x in debian, but unlikely to to happen right now.

In particular, the following two bugs make it impossible to use my current, common monkeysphere workflow:

And GnuPG 2.1.0 drops support for the older, known-weak OpenPGPv3 key formats. This is an important step for simplification, but there are a few people who probably still need to use v3 keys for obscure/janky reasons, or have data encrypted to a v3 key that they need to be able to decrypt. Those people will want to have GnuPG 1.4 around.

Call for testing

Anyway, if you use debian testing or unstable, and you are interested in these features, i invite you to install `gnupg2` and its friends from experimental. If you want to be sensibly conservative, i recommend backing up `~/.gnupg` before trying to use it:

cp -aT .gnupg .gnupg.bak
sudo apt install -t experimental gnupg2 gnupg-agent dirmngr gpgsm gpgv2 scdaemon
If you find issues, please file them via the debian BTS as usual. I (or other members of the pkg-gnupg team) will help you triage them to upstream as needed.

Tags: ecc, experimental, gnupg

Syndicated 2014-11-06 23:27:00 from Weblogs for dkg

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