Older blog entries for ctrlsoft (starting at number 83)

Proof of concept OpenChange server working

Seeing this makes me very happy. It's taken us a couple of years to get to this point but we've finally made it, mostly thanks to the dedication and persistence of Julien and Brad.

Syndicated 2010-06-08 19:09:08 from Stationary Traveller

Input overload

During the last few months, despite filtering and thread-scoring, I'm having trouble keeping up with the continuous flood of emails that come my way. I'm now spending way too much of my time dealing with both email and other background noise (hello, web 2.0 services). To cope with this, I've now dropped off a couple dozen mailing lists, unsubscribed from a similar number of RSS feeds and left a few IRC channels. I'm slowly working working my way through the backlog of emails and merge requests that I still have to deal with. If you need me to participate in a mailing list discussion, please CC me.

cp: Agalloch - Our Fortress Is Burning, pt. 1

Syndicated 2010-03-13 23:05:19 from Stationary Traveller

Nostalgia: 10 Years of Samba Hacking

While searching for something else I happened to come across one of my first posts to the ntdom list in November 2000.

My post is a simple question about a Samba crash that I myself no doubt had introduced. I'm sure I could have found a solution to it by using Google - excuse me, AltaVista - but I still received a friendly reply from Jerry explaining me to use GDB. I'm not too embarrassed, at least I used proper punctuation and wrote somewhat comprehensible English.

It's also strange to realize it's already been almost ten years since I started hacking on the Samba project.

Syndicated 2010-02-11 04:32:00 from Stationary Traveller

Nostalgia: 10 Years of Samba Hacking

While searching for something else I happened to come across one of my first posts to the ntdom list in November 2000.

My post is a simple question about a Samba crash that I myself no doubt had introduced. I'm sure I could have found a solution to it by using Google - excuse me, AltaVista - but I still received a friendly reply from Jerry explaining me to use GDB. I'm not too embarrassed, at least I used proper punctuation and wrote somewhat comprehensible English.

It's also strange to realize it's already been almost ten years since I started hacking on the Samba project.

Syndicated 2010-02-11 01:34:00 from Stationary Traveller

Linux.Conf.Au 2010 - Day 3 - Wednesday

I went to Jonathan Corbet's yearly update of the status of the Linux kernel. He talked about the various big changes that went into the kernel over the last year as well as the development processes. The Linux kernel is probably one of the largest open source projects, and very healthy - there are a lot of individuals and companies contributing to it. With this size
comes a few interesting challenges coping with the flow of changes into Linus' tree. Their current processes seem to deal with this quite well, and don't seem to need a lot of major changes at the moment.

His talk also included the obligatory list of features that landed in the last year. The only one that really matters to me is the Nouveau driver, which I'm looking forward to trying out.

The second talk I went to in the morning was Selena Deckelmann's overview of the Open Source database landscape. She mentioned there's new projects started daily, but it was still a bit disappointing not to see TDB up there.

After lunch Rob gave a talk about Subunit, introducing to the ideas behind the Subunit protocol as well as presenting an overview of the tools that are available for it and the projects that have Subunitized as of yet. It's exciting to see the Subunit universe slowly growing, I wasn't aware of some of the projects that are using it. The recently announced
testrepository also looks interesting, even though it is still very rudimentary at the moment.

In the evening Tridge, Rusty, Andrew, Jeremy,AJ and I participated in the hackoff as the "Samba Team".

The hackoff was a lot of fun, and consisted of 6 problems, each of which involved somehow decoding the data file for the problem and extracting a short token from it in one way or another, which was required to retrieve the next problem. We managed to solve 4 problems in the hour that the organizers had allocated, and ended first because we were a bit quicker in solving the 4th problem than the runner-ups. No doubt the fact that we were the largest team had something to do with this.

I hung out with some of the awesome Git and Github developers in the Malthouse in the evening, and talked about Dulwich, Bazaar and Launchpad ("No *really*, I am not aware of any plans to add Git support to Launchpad.").

Syndicated 2010-02-04 00:06:17 from Stationary Traveller

Linux.Conf.Au 2010 - Day 2 - Tuesday

On Tuesday we had the "Launchpad" mini-conf, which featured talks from various Launchpad developers about different parts of Launchpad as well as from community members about their use of Launchpad. It wasn't necessarily about hosting projects on Launchpad, but rather about how various projects could benefit from Launchpad.

I popped out of Launchpad track for a bit to attend Andrews talk about the current status of Samba 4. He did a nice job of summarizing the events in the last year, the most of import one of course being the support for DC synchronization. I'm proud we've finally managed to pull this off - and hopefully we'll actually have a beta out next year. We have been saying "maybe next year" for almost 4 years now when people asked us for estimates of a release date.

In the afternoon I gave the talk about Launchpad code imports and code reviews that I had prepared with Aaron earlier. We had planned to give the talk together, but I unexpectedly ended up giving it by myself because of some confusion about the schedule.

Syndicated 2010-02-03 19:44:24 from Stationary Traveller

Linux.Conf.Au 2010 - Day 1

Linux.Conf.Au has a reputation for being one of the best FLOSS conferences in the world, and it more than met my (high) expectations. The last one I attended was also in New-Zealand, but further south - in Dunedin.

Day 1 - Monday

As usual there were miniconfs the first two days before the actual conference. On the first day I attended some of the talks in the Open Languages track.

mwhudson gave a talk about pypy - Python implemented in Python. He discussed the reasons for doing what they do and the progress they've made so far. Like so many of the custom Python implementations, one of the main thing that's holding them back is the lack of support for the extensions written in C for CPython.

[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusty_Russell Rusty] gave a quick tutorial to talloc/ after lunch ("it's a shame K&R didn't think of this!") and explained why it's so great.

In the afternoon I caught some of the talks in the distro summit track. Both of the talks that I attended happened to be Ubuntu-related - first Dustin gave a quick introduction to the components of Launchpad, followed by a talk from Lucas about the
relationship between Ubuntu and Debian. There was a discussion afterwards about
interoperability between the various hosting sites and bug trackers. Several audience members questioned the relevance of Debian and suggested everything should just switch to Launchpad, but this seemed to be founded in ignorance. (none were actually Launchpad developers, contrary to the impression Martin seems to have).

Syndicated 2010-02-03 18:15:45 from Stationary Traveller

Build from branch

At the moment I am returning home after three very productive and awesome weeks in Wellington, Sydney and Strasbourg.

I spent the first week in the West Plaza in Wellington, working together with fellow Launchpad developers on getting the basics of building from branches working. We eventually managed to get something working at the end of Friday afternoon. We split the work up at the beginning of the week and then worked on it in pairs for a couple of days before integrating all work on Friday. At the end of the week William managed to get a basic source package build from recipe through the queue.

Pair-programming with Jono and Michael was very educational, I suspect I'll be a fair bit quicker when I get back to hacking on Launchpad by myself. It's scary to see how some people can make the changes that would take me a full day in a mere hour.

Tim picked up my initial work on support for Mercurial imports and completed and landed it during the sprint. Since the rollout on Wednesday it is possible to request Mercurial imports on Launchpad. Most imports (e.g. mutt, dovecot, hg) seem to work fine, with the main exception being the really large Mercurial repositories such as OpenOffice.org and OpenJDK. This is because of (known) scaling issues that will be fixed in one of the next releases of bzr-hg.

This was the first time I was back in Wellington since 2006, and the weather this year was exactly as I remembered it; showers and wind, with the occasional day of sunshine. For a capital the city centre is quite small, but it has its charm and the view from the various hills around the bay is

On the weekend I met up with Andrew and Kirsty and we did some hiking around Wellington (where the weather allowed it).

Syndicated 2010-02-01 16:49:10 from Stationary Traveller

My first week as a Launchpad developer: impressions

Roughly a week ago I joined Julian, Muharem and Michael, working on the Soyuz component of Launchpad. For now I've been working on easy Soyuz bugs, as a way of becoming more familiar with the internals. I'm working from home but I had the chance to hang out with some of the other Launchpad developers, including the full Soyuz team, at Lucid in Dallas.

Launchpad is different from most other FOSS projects I have worked on so far. Some things I noticed during my first week:

The codebase is big and well tied together. I don't think I've ever used grep and ctags as often as I have in the last week. Fortunately, the directory structure makes it relatively easy to predict where to look for things.

Reviews are really quick - no long round-trips between author and reviewer trying to get a branch landed. This is a really *really* great thing.

It's easy to find somebody familiar with a particular piece of code and it doesn't take long to get an answer when you ask questions. I'm still getting used to this - I tend to ask questions sporadically because I have gotten used to having to wait a couple of days for an answer that's actually useful.

Setting up the development environment takes some time. Or perhaps I'm spoiled by Bazaar where "bzr branch lp:bzr bzr && ./bzr/bzr selftest" is all you need to start hacking. And it seems like karmic is the only platform on which things work - I tried with Debian Sid and Lucid as well, but things broke in strange and unusual ways.

The test suite is heavy and takes long to start up, something that makes proper TDD too hard. I also managed to run into some unexplainable problems where the librarian wouldn't shut down on one of my systems. Since there is only one instance of the database it is not really possible to run multiple instances of the testsuite at the same time unless you use chroots or something like that - this makes it hard to work on multiple branches at the same time, something which would especially be nice since the testsuite is slow (so you can run the testsuite in one branch, hack in another and alterate).

Doctests, while fast, a bit of a nuisance. Because of the setup/teardown overhead that is paid for every single test, doc tests are a lot faster than unit tests. On the other hand, pdb doesn't play well with doc tests - it doesn't show any context. Conceptually I also prefer small unit tests over doc tests, since they're quicker to read, easier to understand and there's less side-effects from previous instructions in the test that could affect the code that's being tested.

And for those that know me well; yes, getting used to somewhat regular working hours was indeed a challenge, but I seem to have managed.

Syndicated 2009-12-10 20:10:17 from Stationary Traveller

US: Observations

These past few days in the US were a bit of a rollercoaster. Some random observations:

  • The mentor summit was very nice and well organized (or rather: well disorganized). Lots of awesome people around from a wide variety of projects and nationalities.
  • "Next Generation VCS" seems to be an alias for git these days in the minds of most people.
  • I didn't write a single line of code in almost a week, something that is very rare.
  • Driving an automatic gives you two spare limbs to use for other things. What those other things are, I have yet to figure out.
  • Is the fact that your kid was student of the month or the fact that you own two cats and a dog really something that belongs on a bumper sticker?
  • Gas is cheap (compared to Europe). I drove 300 miles on a $30 tank.
  • The malls in the Bay Area are some of the biggest I've ever seen, but strangely enough they seem to lack both book- and cd-stores.
  • Visiting Fry's continues to have a significant effect on the contents of my wallet.
  • It is legal to turn right on a red traffic sign in California unless otherwise indicated. It took me a while to realize this until people repeatedly started honking behind me...
  • The waiver I had to sign to be able to skydive in California was scary. I can cope with my operating system coming without even the implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, but my parachute?
  • I stopped pretending to have any regularity in my sleeping habits. 6 AM flights? It seemed like a good idea at the time.

Syndicated 2009-10-30 16:54:00 from Stationary Traveller

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