Older blog entries for bagder (starting at number 814)

licensed to get shared

As my http2 presentation is about to get its 16,000th viewer over at Slideshare I just have to take a moment and reflect over that fact.

Sixteen thousand viewers. I’ve uploaded slides there before over the years but no other presentation has gotten even close to this amount of attention even though some of them have been collecting views for years by now.

http2 presentation screenshot

I wrote my http2 explained document largely due to the popularity of my presentation and the stream of questions and curiosity that brought to life. Within just a couple of days, that 27 page document had been downloaded more than 2,000 times and by now over 5000 times. This is almost 7MB of PDF which I believe raises the bar for the ordinary casual browser to not download it without having an interest and intention to at least glance through it. Of course I realize a large portion of said downloads are never really read.

Someone suggested to me (possibly in jest) that I should convert these into ebooks and “charge 1 USD a piece to get some profit out of them”. I really won’t and I would have a struggle to do that. It has been said before but in my case it is indeed true: I stand on the shoulders of giants. I’ve just collected information and written down texts that mostly are ideas, suggestions and conclusions others have already made in various other forums, lists or documents. I wouldn’t feel right charging for that nor depriving anyone the rights and freedoms to create derivatives and continue building on what I’ve done. I’m just the curator and janitor here. Besides, I already have an awesome job at an awesome company that allows me to work full time on open source – every day.

The next phase started thanks to the open license. A friendly volunteer named Vladimir Lettiev showed up and translated the entire document into Russian and now suddenly the reach of the text is vastly expanded into a territory where it previously just couldn’t penetrate. With using people’s native languages, information can really trickle down to a much larger audience. Especially in regions that aren’t very Englishified.

Syndicated 2014-05-06 11:33:54 from daniel.haxx.se

#MeraKrypto

A whole range of significant Swedish network organizations (ISOC, SNUS, DFRI and SUNET) organized a full-day event today, managed by the great mr Olle E Johansson. The event, called “MeraKrypto” (MoreCrypto would be the exact translation), was a day with introductions to TLS and a lot of talks around TLS and other encryption and security related topics.

I was there and held a talk on the topic of “curl and TLS” and I basically talked some basics around what curl and libcurl are, how we do TLS, some common problems and hwo verifying the server cert is a common usage mistake and then I continued on to quickly mention how http2 and TLS relate..See my slides below, but please be aware that as usual you may not grasp the whole thing only by the (English) slides. The event was fully booked so there was around one hundred peeps in the audience and there were a lot of interested minds that asked good questions proving they really understood the topics.

The discussion almost got heated during the talk about how companies do MITMing of SSL sessions and this guy from Bluecoat pretty much single-handedly argued for the need for this and how “it fills a useful purpose”.

It was a great afternoon!

The event was streamed live and recorded on video. I’ll post a link as soon as it gets available to me.

Syndicated 2014-04-29 21:06:42 from daniel.haxx.se

http2 explained

http2 front page

I’m hereby offering you all the first version of my document explaining http2, the protocol. It features explanations on the background, basic fundamentals, details on the wire format and something about existing implementations and what’s to expect for the future.

The full PDF currently boasts 27 pages at version 1.0, but I plan to keep up with the http2 development going further and I’m also kind of thinking that I will get at least some user feedback, and I’ll do subsequent updates to improve and extend the document over time. Of course time will tell how good that will work.

The document is edited in libreoffice and that file is available on github, but ODT is really not a format suitable for patches and merges so I hope we can sort out changes with filing issues and sending emails.

Syndicated 2014-04-26 14:07:33 from daniel.haxx.se

Wireshark dissector work

WiresharkRecently I cloned the Wireshark git repository and started updating the http2 dissector. That’s the piece of code that gets called to analyze a stream of data that Wireshark thinks is http2.

The current http2 dissector was left at draft-09 state, while the current draft at the time was number 11 and there have been several changes on the binary format since so any reasonably updated client or server would send or receive byte streams that Wireshark couldn’t properly display.

I never wrote any dissector code before but I must say Wireshark didn’t disappoint. It was straight forward and mostly downright easy to fix most of the wrong details. I’m not pretending to be a master at this nor is the dissector code anywhere near “finished” yet but I still enjoyed the API and how to write a thing like this.

I’ve since dissected plain-text http2 streams that I’ve done with curl+nghttp2 and I’ve also used the SSLKEYLOGFILE trick with Firefox to automatically decrypt the TLS session and have the dissector figure out the underlying http2 parts.

If there’s any little snag to mention, it is the fact that they insist on getting patches submitted directly to gerrit instead of any mailing list or similar. This required me to create a gerrit account, and really figure out how to push my stuff from git to there, instead of the more traditional and simpler approach of just sending my patch to a mailing list or possibly submitting it to a bug/patch tracker somewhere with my browser.

Call me old-style but in fact the hip way of today with a pull-request github style would also have been much easier. Here’s what my gerrit submission looks like. But I get it, gerrit does push a little more work over to the submitter and I figure that once a submitter such as myself finally has fixed all the nits in the patch it is very easy for the project to actually merge it. I actually got someone else to help me point out how to even find the link to view the code review after the first one was submitted on the site… (when I post this, my patch has not yet been accepted or merged into the wireshark git repo)

Here’s a basic screenshot showing a trace of Firefox requesting https://nghttp2.org using http2. Click it for the full thing.

wireshark-screenshot

.. and what happens this morning my time? There’s a brand new http2 draft-12 out with more changes on the on-the-wire format! Well to be honest, that really wasn’t a surprise. I’ll get the new stuff supported too, but I’ll do that in a separate patch as I prefer to hold off until I see a live stream by at least one implementation to test against.

Syndicated 2014-04-24 07:05:47 from daniel.haxx.se

curl and proxy headers

Starting in the next curl release, 7.37.0, the curl tool supports the new command line option –proxy-header. (Completely merged at this commit.)

It works exactly like –header does, but will only include the headers in requests sent to a proxy, while the opposite is true for –header: that will only be sent in requests that will go to the end server. But of course, if you use a HTTP proxy and do a normal GET for example, curl will include headers for both the proxy and the server in the request. The bigger difference is when using CONNECT to a proxy, which then only will use proxy headers.

libcurl

For libcurl, the story is slightly different and more complicated since we’re having things backwards compatible there. The new libcurl still works exactly like the former one by default.

CURLOPT_PROXYHEADER is the new option that is the new proxy header option that should be set up exactly like CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER is

CURLOPT_HEADEROPT is then what an application uses to set how libcurl should use the two header options. Again, by default libcurl will keep working like before and use the CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER list in all HTTP requests. To change that behavior and use the new functionality instead, set CURLOPT_HEADEROPT to CURLHEADER_SEPARATE.

Then, the header lists will be handled as separate. An application can then switch back to the old behavior with a unified header list by using CURLOPT_HEADEROPT set to CURLHEADER_UNIFIED.

Syndicated 2014-04-04 15:44:46 from daniel.haxx.se

Presentation: what is http2

We had the 14th meetup with foss-sthlm yesterday and I talked about http2 for the almost 100 attendees in the audience. See my slides at slideshare:

Syndicated 2014-04-02 06:17:32 from daniel.haxx.se

curl and the road to IPv6

I’d like to comment Paul Saab’s presentation from the other day at the World IPv6 Congress titled “The Road To IPv6 – Bumpy“. Paul works for Facebook and in his talk he apparently mentioned curl (slide 24 of the PDF set).

Lots of my friends have since directed my attention to those slides and asked for my comment. I haven’t seen Paul’s actual presentation, only read the slides, but I have had a shorter twitter conversation with him about what he meant with his words.

The slide in question says exactly this:

Curl

  • Very hostile to the format of the IPv6 address
  • Wants everything bracket enclosed
  • Many IPv6 bugs that only recently were fixed

Let’s see what those mean. Very hostile to the format of the IPv6 address and Wants everything bracket enclosed are basically the same thing.

Paul makes a big point about the fact that if you want to write a URL with an IP address instead of a host name, you have to put that IP address within [brackets] when the IP address is an IPv6 one, which you don’t do if it is an IPv4 one.

Right. Sure. You do. That’s certainly an obstacle when converting slightly naive applications from IPv4 to IPv6 environments. This syntax is mandated by RFCs and standards (RFC3986 to be exact). curl follows the standards and you’ll do it the same way in other tools and clients that use URLs. The problem manifests itself if you use curl for your task, but if you’d use something else instead that something else would have the same issue if it follows the standards. The reason for the brackets requirements is of course that IPv6 numerical addresses contain colons and colons already have a reserved meaning in the host part of URLs so they had to come up with some way to handle that.

Then finally, Many IPv6 bugs that only recently were fixed he said.

I’m the main developer and maintainer of the curl project. This is news to me. Sure we always fix bugs and we always find stupid things we fix so there’s no doubt about that we’ve had IPv6 related bugs that we’ve fixed – and that we still have IPv6 related bugs we haven’t yet found – but saying that we fixed many such bugs recently? That isn’t something I’m aware of. My guess is that he’s talking about hiccups we’ve had after introducing happy eyeballs, a change we introduced in release 7.34.0 in December 2013.

curl has had IPv6 support since January 2001. We’re on that bumpy road to IPv6!

Syndicated 2014-03-28 12:21:43 from daniel.haxx.se

groups.google.com hates greylisting

Dear Google,

Here’s a Wikipedia article for you: Greylisting.

After you’ve read that, then consider the error message I always get for my groups.google.com account when you disable mail sending to me due to “bouncing”:

Bounce status Your email address is currently flagged as bouncing. For additional information or to correct this, view your email status here [link].

Following that link I get to read the reason:

“Google tried to deliver your message, but it was rejected by the server for the recipient domain haxx.se by [mailserver]. The error that the other server returned was: 451 4.7.1 Greylisting in action, please come back later”

See, even the error message spells out what it is all about!

Thanks to this feature of Google groups, I cannot participate in any such lists/groups for as long as I keep my greylisting activated since it’ll keep disabling mail delivery to me.

Enabling greylisting decreased my spam flood to roughly a third of the previous volume (and now I’m at 500-1000 spam emails/day) so I’m not ready to disable it yet. I just have to not use google groups.

Syndicated 2014-03-27 14:00:03 from daniel.haxx.se

Reducing the Public Suffix pain?

Let me introduce you to what I consider one of the worst hacks we have in current and modern internet protocols: the Public Suffix List (PSL). This is a list (maintained by Mozilla) with domains that have some kind administrative setup or arrangement that makes sub-domains independent. For example, you can’t be allowed to set cookies for “*.com” because .com is a TLD that has independent domains. But the same thing goes for “*.co.uk” and there’s no hint anywhere about this – except for the Public Suffix List. Then, take that simple little example and extrapolate to a domain system that grows with several new TLDs every month and more. The PSL is now several thousands of entries long.

And cookies isn’t the only thing this is used for. Another really common and perhaps even more important use case is for wildcard matches in TLS server certificates. You should not be allowed to buy and use a cert for “*.co.uk” but you can for “*.yourcompany.co.uk”…

Not really official but still…

If you read the cookie RFC or the spec for how to do TLS wildcard certificate matching you won’t read any line putting it crystal clear that the Suffix List is what you must use and I’m sure different browser solve this slightly differently but in practice and most unfortunately (if you ask me) you must either use the list or make your own to be fully compliant with how the web works 2014.

curl, wget and the PSL

In curl and libcurl, we have so far not taken the PSL into account which is by choice since I’ve not had any decent way to handle it and there are lots of embedded and use cases that simply won’t be able to cope with that large PSL chunk.

Wget hasn’t had any PSL awareness either, but the recent weeks this has been brought up on the wget list and more attention has been given to this. Work has been initiated to do something about it, which has lead to…

libpsl

Tim Rühsen took the baton and started the libpsl project and its associated mailing list, as a foundation for something for Wget to use to get PSL awareness.

I’ve mostly cheered the effort so far and said that I wouldn’t mind building on this to enhance curl in the future if it just gets a suitable (liberal enough) license and it seems to go in that direction. For curl’s sake, I would like to get a conditional dependency on this so that people without particular size restrictions can use this, and people on more embedded and special-purpose situations can continue to build without PSL support.

If you’re interested in helping out in curl and libcurl in this area, feel most welcome!

dbound

Meanwhile, the IETF has set up a new mailing list called dbound for discussions around PSL and similar issues and it seems very timely!

Syndicated 2014-03-24 08:37:28 from daniel.haxx.se

what’s –next for curl

curl is finally getting support for doing multiple independent requests specified in the same command line, which allows users to make even better use of curl’s excellent persistent connection handling and more. I don’t know when I first got the question of how to do a GET and a POST in a single command line with curl, but I do know that we’ve had the TODO item about adding such a feature mentioned since 2004 – and I know it wasn’t added there right away…

Starting in curl 7.36.0, we can respond with a better answer: use the –next option!

curl has been able to work with multiple URLs on the command line virtually since day 1, but all the command line options would then mostly apply and be used for all specified URLs.

This new –next option introduces a “boundary”, or a wall if you like, between options on the command line. The options set before –next will be handled as one request and the options set on the right side of –next will start adding up to another request. You of course then need to specify at least one URL per individual such section and you can add any number of –next on the command line. If the command line then gets too long, we also support the same logic and sequence in the “config files” which is the way you can specify command line arguments into a text file and have curl read them from there using -K or –config.

Here’s a somewhat silly example to illustrate. This fist makes a POST and then a HEAD to two different pages on the same host:

curl -d FOO example.com/input.cgi --next --head example.com/robots.txt

Thanks to Steve Holme for his hard work on implementing this!

Syndicated 2014-03-12 20:53:30 from daniel.haxx.se

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