bagder is currently certified at Master level.

Name: Daniel Stenberg
Member since: 2000-05-10 09:34:05
Last Login: 2009-12-04 19:23:29

FOAF RDF Share This



My blog is on


Articles Posted by bagder

Recent blog entries by bagder

Syndication: RSS 2.0

“Subject: Urgent Warning”

Back in December I got a desperate email from this person. A woman who said her Instagram had been hacked and since she found my contact info in the app she mailed me and asked for help. I of course replied and said that I have nothing to do with her being hacked but I also have nothing to do with Instagram other than that they use software I’ve written.

Today she writes back. Clearly not convinced I told the truth before, and now she strikes back with more “evidence” of my wrongdoings.

Dear Daniel,

I had emailed you a couple months ago about my “screen dumps” aka screenshots and asked for your help with restoring my Instagram account since it had been hacked, my photos changed, and your name was included in the coding. You claimed to have no involvement whatsoever in developing a third party app for Instagram and could not help me salvage my original Instagram photos, pre-hacked, despite Instagram serving as my Photography portfolio and my career is a Photographer.

Since you weren’t aware that your name was attached to Instagram related hacking code, I thought you might want to know, in case you weren’t already aware, that your name is also included in Spotify terms and conditions. I came across this information using my Spotify which has also been hacked into and would love your help hacking out of Spotify. Also, I have yet to figure out how to unhack the hackers from my Instagram so if you change your mind and want to restore my Instagram to its original form as well as help me secure my account from future privacy breaches, I’d be extremely grateful. As you know, changing my passwords did nothing to resolve the problem. Please keep in mind that Facebook owns Instagram and these are big companies that you likely don’t want to have a trail of evidence that you are a part of an Instagram and Spotify hacking ring. Also, Spotify is a major partner of Spotify so you are likely familiar with the coding for all of these illegally developed third party apps. I’d be grateful for your help fixing this error immediately.

Thank you,

[name redacted]

P.S. Please see attached screen dump for a screen shot of your contact info included in Spotify (or what more likely seems to be a hacked Spotify developed illegally by a third party).

Spotify credits screenshot

Here’s the Instagram screenshot she sent me in a previous email:

Instagram credits screenshot

I’ve tried to respond with calm and clear reasonable logic and technical details on why she’s seeing my name there. That clearly failed. What do I try next?

Syndicated 2016-01-19 08:37:32 from

Two years of Mozilla

Today marks my two year anniversary of being employed by one of the greatest companies I’m aware of.

I get to work with open source all day, every day. I get to work for a company that isn’t driven by handing over profits to its owners for some sort of return on investment. I get to work on curl as part of my job. I get to work with internetworking, which is awesomely fun, hard, thrilling and hair-tearing all at ones. I get to work with protocol standards like within the IETF and my employer can let me go to meetings. In the struggle for good, against evil and for the users of the world, I think I’m on the right side. For users, for privacy, for openness, for inclusiveness. I feel I’m a mozillian now.

So what did I achieve during my first two years with the dinosaur logo company? Not nearly enough of what I’ve wanted or possibly initially thought I would. I’ve faced a lot of tough bugs and hard challenges and I’ve landed and backed out changes all through-out this period. But I like to think that it is a net gain and even when running head first into a wall, that can be educational and we can learn from it and then when we take a few steps back and race forwards again we can use that knowledge and make better decision for the future.

Future you say? Yeah, I’m heading on in the same style, without raising my focus point very much and continuously looking for my next thing very close in time. I grab issues to work on with as little foresight as possible but I completely assume they will continue to be tough nuts to crack and there will be new networking issues to conquer going forward as well. I’ll keep working on open source, open standards and a better internet for users. I really enjoy working for Mozilla!

Mozilla dinosaur head logo

Syndicated 2016-01-13 09:05:11 from

Tales from my inbox, part++

“Josh” sent me an email. Pardon the language here but I decided to show the mail body unaltered:

From: Josh Yanez <a gmail address>
Date: Wed, 6 Jan 2016 22:27:13 -0800
To: daniel
Subject: Hey fucker

I got all your fucking info either you turn yourself in or ill show it to the police. You think I'm playing try me I got all your stupid little coding too.

Sent from my iPhone

This generates so many questions

  1. I’ve had threats mailed to be before (even done over phone) so this is far from the first time. The few times I’ve bothered to actually try to understand what these people are hallucinating about, it usually turns out that they’ve discovered that someone has hacked them or targeted them in some sort of attack and curl was used and I am the main author so I’m the bad guy.
  2. He has all my “info” and my “stupid little coding too” ? What “coding” could that be? What is all my info?
  3. Is this just a spam somehow that wants me to reply? It is directed to me only and I’ve not heard of anyone else who got a mail similar to this.
  4. The lovely “Sent from my iPhone” signature is sort of hilarious too after such an offensive message.

Very aware this could just as well suck me into a deep and dark hole of sadness, I was just too curious to resist so I responded. Unfortunately I didn’t get anything further back so the story thus ends here, a bit abrupt. :-(

Syndicated 2016-01-11 13:30:03 from

HTTP/2 adoption, end of 2015

http2 front imageWhen I asked my surrounding in March 2015 to guess the expected HTTP/2 adoption by now, we as a group ended up with about 10%. OK, the question was vaguely phrased and what does it really mean? Let’s take a look at some aspects of where we are now.

Perhaps the biggest flaw in the question was that it didn’t specify HTTPS. All the browsers of today only implement HTTP/2 over HTTPS so of course if every HTTPS site in the world would support HTTP/2 that would still be far away from all the HTTP requests. Admittedly, browsers aren’t the only HTTP clients…

During the fall of 2015, both nginx and Apache shipped release versions with HTTP/2 support. nginx made it slightly harder for people by forcing users to select either SPDY or HTTP/2 (which was a technical choice done by them, not really enforced by the protocols) and also still telling users that SPDY is the safer choice.

Let’s Encrypt‘s finally launching their public beta in the early December also helps HTTP/2 by removing one of the most annoying HTTPS obstacles: the cost and manual administration of server certs.

Amount of Firefox responses

This is the easiest metric since Mozilla offers public access to the metric data. It is skewed since it is opt-in data and we know that certain kinds of users are less likely to enable this (if you’re more privacy aware or if you’re using it in enterprise environments for example). This also then measures the share by volume of requests; making the popular sites get more weight.

Firefox 43 counts no less than 22% of all HTTP responses as HTTP/2 (based on data from Dec 8 to Dec 16, 2015).

Out of all HTTP traffic Firefox 43 generates, about 63% is HTTPS which then makes almost 35% of all Firefox HTTPS requests are HTTP/2!

Firefox 43 is also negotiating HTTP/2 four times as often as it ends up with SPDY.

Amount of browser traffic

One estimate of how large share of browsers that supports HTTP/2 is the number. Roughly 70% on a global level. Another metric is the one published by KeyCDN at the end of October 2015. When they enabled HTTP/2 by default for their HTTPS customers world wide, the average number of users negotiating HTTP/2 turned out to be 51%. More than half!

Cloudflare however, claims the share of supported browsers are at a mere 26%. That’s a really big difference and I personally don’t buy their numbers as they’re way too negative and give some popular browsers very small market share. For example: Chrome 41 – 49 at a mere 15% of the world market, really?

I think the key is rather that it all boils down to what you measure – as always.

Amount of the top-sites in the world

Netcraft bundles SPDY with HTTP/2 in their October report, but it says that “29% of SSL sites within the thousand most popular sites currently support SPDY or HTTP/2, while 8% of those within the top million sites do.” (note the “of SSL sites” in there)

That’s now slightly old data that came out almost exactly when Apache first release its HTTP/2 support in a public release and Nginx hadn’t even had it for a full month yet.

Facebook eventually enabled HTTP/2 in November 2015.

Amount of “regular” sites

There’s still no ideal service that scans a larger portion of the Internet to measure adoption level. The site is about to change to a chrome-based spider (from IE) and once that goes live I hope that we will get better data.

W3Tech’s report says 2.5% of web sites in early December – less than SPDY!

I like how looks so far and I’ve provided them with my personal opinions and feedback on what I think they should do to make that the preferred site for this sort of data.

Using the shodan search engine, we could see that mid December 2015 there were about 115,000 servers on the Internet using HTTP/2.  That’s 20,000 (~24%) more than isthewebhttp2yet site says. It doesn’t really show percentages there, but it could be interpreted to say that slightly over 6% of HTTP/1.1 sites also support HTTP/2.

On Dec 3rd 2015, Cloudflare enabled HTTP/2 for all its customers and they claimed they doubled the number of HTTP/2 servers on the net in that single move. (The shodan numbers seem to disagree with that statement.)

Amount of system lib support

iOS 9 supports HTTP/2 in its native HTTP library. That’s so far the leader of HTTP/2 in system libraries department. Does Mac OS X have something similar?

I had expected Window’s wininet or other HTTP libs to be up there as well but I can’t find any details online about it. I hear the Android HTTP libs are not up to snuff either but since okhttp is now part of Android to some extent, I guess proper HTTP/2 in Android is not too far away?

Amount of HTTP API support

I hear very little about HTTP API providers accepting HTTP/2 in addition or even instead of HTTP/1.1. My perception is that this is basically not happening at all yet.

Next-gen experiments

If you’re using a modern Chrome browser today against a Google service you’re already (mostly) using QUIC instead of HTTP/2, thus you aren’t really adding to the HTTP/2 client side numbers but you’re also not adding to the HTTP/1.1 numbers.

QUIC and other QUIC-like (UDP-based with the entire stack in user space) protocols are destined to grow and get used even more as we go forward. I’m convinced of this.


Everyone was right! It is mostly a matter of what you meant and how to measure it.


Recall the words on the Chromium blog: “We plan to remove support for SPDY in early 2016“. For Firefox we haven’t said anything that absolute, but I doubt that Firefox will support SPDY for very long after Chrome drops it.

Syndicated 2015-12-23 23:03:26 from

A 2015 retrospective

Wow, another year has passed. Summing up some things I did this year.


I don’t really have good global commit count for the year, but github counts 1300 commits and I believe the vast majority of my commits are hosted there. Most of them in curl and curl-oriented projects.

We did 8 curl releases during the year featuring a total of 575 bug fixes. The almost 1,200 commits were authored by 107 different individuals.


I continued working on http2 explained during the year, and after having changed to markdown format it is now available in more languages than ever thanks to our awesome translators!

I started my second book project in the fall of 2015, using the working title everything curl, which is a much larger book effort than the HTTP/2 book and after having just passed 23,500 words that create over 110 pages in the PDF version, almost half of the planned sections are still left to write…


I almost doubled my number of twitter followers during this year, now at 2,850 something. While this is a pointless number, reaching out slightly further does have the advantage that I get better responses and that makes me appreciate and get more out of twitter.


I’ve continued to respond to questions there, and my total count is now at 550 answers, out of which I wrote about 80 this year. The top scored answer I wrote during 2015 is for a question that isn’t phrased like one: Apache and HTTP2.

Keyboard use

I’ve pressed a bit over 6.4 million keys on my primary keyboard during the year, and 10.7% of the keys were pressed on weekends.

During the 2900+ hours when at least one key press were registered, I averaged on 2206 key presses per hour.

The most excessive key banging hour of the year started  September 21 at 14:00 and ended with me reaching 10,875 key presses.

The most excessive day was June 9, during which I pushed 63,757 keys.


This is all the 16 opportunities where I’ve talked in front of an audience during 2015. As you will see, the list of topics were fairly limited…

Daniel talking at Apachecon 2015

Syndicated 2015-12-20 22:33:56 from

921 older entries...


bagder certified others as follows:

  • bagder certified shughes as Journeyer
  • bagder certified andrei as Master
  • bagder certified kbob as Apprentice
  • bagder certified mbp as Master
  • bagder certified shughes as Journeyer
  • bagder certified sussman as Journeyer
  • bagder certified mpawlo as Apprentice
  • bagder certified BrucePerens as Master
  • bagder certified rmk as Master
  • bagder certified Fefe as Journeyer
  • bagder certified gstein as Master
  • bagder certified robey as Master
  • bagder certified edd as Journeyer
  • bagder certified ask as Journeyer
  • bagder certified joe as Master
  • bagder certified alan as Master
  • bagder certified pawal as Apprentice
  • bagder certified stone as Apprentice
  • bagder certified sej as Journeyer
  • bagder certified fxn as Apprentice
  • bagder certified forrest as Apprentice
  • bagder certified wsanchez as Master
  • bagder certified zagor as Journeyer
  • bagder certified ben as Master
  • bagder certified kfogel as Master
  • bagder certified orabidoo as Master
  • bagder certified linas as Master
  • bagder certified jas as Master

Others have certified bagder as follows:

  • ib certified bagder as Master
  • chipx86 certified bagder as Master
  • rupert certified bagder as Master
  • larsu certified bagder as Master
  • mvw certified bagder as Journeyer
  • neurogato certified bagder as Journeyer
  • whytheluckystiff certified bagder as Master
  • andrei certified bagder as Journeyer
  • jbowman certified bagder as Journeyer
  • alexr certified bagder as Journeyer
  • pretzelgod certified bagder as Journeyer
  • thallgren certified bagder as Journeyer
  • execve certified bagder as Master
  • pelleb certified bagder as Master
  • GJF certified bagder as Master
  • kroah certified bagder as Master
  • jooon certified bagder as Master
  • nixnut certified bagder as Journeyer
  • jLoki certified bagder as Master
  • mpawlo certified bagder as Journeyer
  • technik certified bagder as Master
  • highgeek certified bagder as Journeyer
  • Stab certified bagder as Master
  • TheCorruptor certified bagder as Master
  • sethcohn certified bagder as Master
  • elho certified bagder as Master
  • monkeyiq certified bagder as Master
  • ebf certified bagder as Master
  • jmg certified bagder as Master
  • robey certified bagder as Master
  • edd certified bagder as Master
  • jbontje certified bagder as Journeyer
  • khazad certified bagder as Master
  • walken certified bagder as Master
  • ask certified bagder as Journeyer
  • xsa certified bagder as Master
  • shlomif certified bagder as Master
  • pawal certified bagder as Master
  • CarloK certified bagder as Master
  • stone certified bagder as Master
  • lerdsuwa certified bagder as Master
  • sej certified bagder as Master
  • nny certified bagder as Journeyer
  • ks certified bagder as Journeyer
  • fxn certified bagder as Master
  • jono certified bagder as Master
  • forrest certified bagder as Master
  • rw2 certified bagder as Master
  • wsanchez certified bagder as Master
  • dlc certified bagder as Journeyer
  • zagor certified bagder as Journeyer
  • ncm certified bagder as Master
  • redi certified bagder as Master
  • ianweller certified bagder as Master
  • bwy certified bagder as Master
  • badvogato certified bagder as Journeyer
  • mnot certified bagder as Master
  • Limbus certified bagder as Master

[ Certification disabled because you're not logged in. ]

New Advogato Features

New HTML Parser: The long-awaited libxml2 based HTML parser code is live. It needs further work but already handles most markup better than the original parser.

Keep up with the latest Advogato features by reading the Advogato status blog.

If you're a C programmer with some spare time, take a look at the mod_virgule project page and help us with one of the tasks on the ToDo list!

Share this page