bagder is currently certified at Master level.

Name: Daniel Stenberg
Member since: 2000-05-10 09:34:05
Last Login: 2009-12-04 19:23:29

FOAF RDF Share This

Homepage: http://daniel.haxx.se/

Notes:

My blog is on daniel.haxx.se/blog

Projects

Articles Posted by bagder

Recent blog entries by bagder

Syndication: RSS 2.0

The last HTTP Workshop day

This workshop has been really intense days so far and this last and forth Workshop day did not turn out different. We started out the morning with the presentation: Caching, Intermediation and the Modern Web by Martin Thomson (Mozilla) describing his idea of a “blind cache” and how it could help to offer caching in a HTTPS world. It of course brought a lot of discussions and further brainstorming on the ideas and how various people in the room thought the idea could be improved or changed.

Immediately following that, Martin continued with a second presentation describing for us a suggested new encryption format for HTTP based on the JWE format and how it could possible be used.

The room then debated connection coalescing (with HTTP/2) for a while and some shared their experiences and thoughts on the topic. It is an area where over-sharing based on the wrong assumptions certainly can lead to tears and unhappiness but it seems the few in the room who actually have implemented this seemed to have considered most of the problems people could foresee.

Support of Trailers in HTTP was brought up and we discussed its virtues for a while vs the possible problems with supporting it and what possible caveats could be, and we also explored the idea of using HTTP/2 push instead of trailers to allow servers to send meta-data that way, and that then also doesn’t necessarily have to follow after the transfer but can in fact be sent during transfer!

Resumed uploads is a topic that comes back every now and then and that has some interest. (It is probably one of the most frequently requested protocol features I get asked about.) It was brought up as something we should probably discuss further, and especially when discussing the next generation HTTP.

At some point in the future we will start talking about HTTP/3. We had a long discussion with the whole team here on what HTTP/3 could entail and we also explored general future HTTP and HTTP/2 extensions and more. A massive list of possible future work was created. The list ended up with something like 70 different things to discuss or work on, but of course most of those things will never actually become reality.

With so much possible or potential work ahead, we need to involve more people that want to and can consider writing specs and to show how easy it apparently can be, Martin demoed how to write a first I-D draft using the fancy Internet Draft Template Repository. Go check it out!

Poul-Henning Kamp brought up the topic of “CO2 usage of the Internet” and argued for that current and future protocol work needs to consider its environmental impact and how “green” it is. Ilya Grigorik (Google) showed off numbers from http archive.org’s data and demoed how easy it is to use the big query feature to extract useful information and statistical info out of the vast amount of data they’ve gathered there. Brad Fitspatrick (Google) showed off his awesome tool h2i and how we can use it to poke on and test HTTP/2 server implementations in a really convenient and almost telnet-style command line using way.

Finally, Mark Nottingham (Akamai) showed off his redbot.org service that runs HTTP against a site, checks its responses and reports with details exactly what it responds and why and provide a bunch of analysis and informational based on that.

Such an eventful day really had to be rounded off with a bunch of beers and so we did. The HTTP Workshop of the summer 2015 ended. The event was great. The attendees were great. The facilities and the good were perfect. I couldn’t ask for more. Thanks for arranging such a great happening!

I’ll round off showing off my laptop lid after the two new stickers of the week were applied. (The HTTP Workshop one and an Apache one I got from Roy):

laptop-stickers

… I’ll get up early tomorrow morning and fly back home.

Syndicated 2015-07-30 22:43:35 from daniel.haxx.se

A third day of HTTP Workshopping

I’ve met a bunch of new faces and friends here at the HTTP Workshop in Münster. Several who I’ve only seen or chatted with online before and some that I never interacted with until now. Pretty awesome really.

Out of the almost forty HTTP fanatics present at this workshop, five persons are from Google, four from Mozilla (including myself) and Akamai has three employees here. Those are the top-3 companies. There are a few others with 2 representatives but most people here are the only guys from their company. Yes they are all guys. We are all guys. The male dominance at this event is really extreme and we’ve discussed this sad circumstance during breaks and it hasn’t gone unnoticed.

This particular day started out grand with Eric Rescorla (of Mozilla) talking about HTTP Security in his marvelous high-speed style. Lots of talk about how how the HTTPS usage is right now on  the web, HTTPS trends, TLS 1.3 details and when it is coming and we got into a lot of talk about how HTTP deprecation and what can and cannot be done etc.

Next up was a presentation about  HTTP Privacy and Anonymity by Mike Perry (from the Tor project) about lots of aspects of what the Tor guys consider regarding fingerprinting, correlation, network side-channels and similar things that can be used to attempt to track user or usage over the Tor network. We got into details about what recent protocols like HTTP/2 and QUIC “leak” or open up for fingerprinting and what (if anything) can or could be done to mitigate the effects.

Evolving HTTP Header Fields by Julian Reschke (of Green Bytes) then followed, discussing all the variations of header syntax that we have in HTTP and how it really is not possible to write a generic parser that can handle them, with a suggestion on how to unify this and introduce a common format for future new headers. Julian’s suggestion to use JSON for this ignited a discussion about header formats in general and what should or could be done for HTTP/3 and if keeping support for the old formats is necessary or not going forward. No real consensus was reached.

Willy Tarreau (from HAProxy) then took us into the world of HTTP Infrastructure scaling and Load balancing, and showed us on the microsecond level how fast a load balancer can be, how much extra work adding HTTPS can mean and then ending with a couple suggestions of what he thinks could’ve helped his scenario. That then turned into a general discussion and network architecture brainstorm on what can be done, how it could be improved and what TLS and other protocols could possibly be do to aid. Cramming out every possible gigabit out of load balancers certainly is a challange.

Talking about cramming bits, Kazuho Oku got to show the final slides when he showed how he’s managed to get his picohttpparser to parse HTTP/1 headers at a speed that is only slightly slower than strlen() – including a raw dump of the x86 assembler the code is turned into by a compiler. What could possibly be a better way to end a day full of protocol geekery?

Google graciously sponsored the team dinner in the evening at a Peruvian place in the town! Yet another fully packed day has ended.

I’ll top off today’s summary with a picture of the gift Mark Nottingham (who’s herding us through these days) was handing out today to make us stay keen and alert (Mark pointed out to me that this was a gift from one of our Japanese friends here):

kitkat

Syndicated 2015-07-29 20:37:39 from daniel.haxx.se

HTTP Workshop, second day

All 37 of us gathered again on the 3rd floor in the Factory hotel here in Münster. Day two of the HTTP Workshop.

Jana Iyengar (from Google) kicked off this morning with his presentations on HTTP and the Transport Layer and QUIC. Very interesting area if you ask me – if you’re interested in this, you really should check out the video recording from the barbof they did on this topic in the recent Prague IETF. It is clear that a team with dedication, a clear use-case, a fearless view on keeping layers and a handy control of widely used servers and clients can do funky experiments with new transport protocols.

I think there was general agreement with Jana’s statement that “Engagement with the transport community is critical” for us to really be able to bring better web protocols now and in the future. Jana’s excellent presentations were interrupted a countless number of times with questions, elaborations, concerns and sub-topics from attendees.

Gaetano Carlucci followed up with a presentation of their QUIC evaluations, showing how it performs under various situations like packet loss etc in comparison to HTTP/2. Lots of transport related discussions followed.

We rounded off the afternoon with a walk through the city (the rain stopped just minutes before we took off) to the town center where we tried some of the local beers while arguing their individual qualities. We then took off in separate directions and had dinner in smaller groups across the city.

snackstation

Syndicated 2015-07-28 20:06:21 from daniel.haxx.se

The HTTP Workshop started

So we started today. I won’t get into any live details or quotes from the day since it has all been informal and we’ve all agreed to not expose snippets from here without checking properly first. There will be a detailed report put together from this event afterwards.

The most critical peace of information is however how we must not walk on the red parts of the sidewalks here in Münster, as that’s the bicycle lane and they can be ruthless there.

We’ve had a bunch of presentations today with associated Q&A and follow-up discussions. Roy Fielding (HTTP spec pioneer) started out the series with a look at HTTP full of historic details and views from the past and where we are and what we’ve gone through over the years. Patrick Mcmanus (of Firefox HTTP networking) took us through some of the quirks of what a modern day browser has to do to speak HTTP and topped it off with a quiz regrading Firefox metrics. Did you know 31% of all Firefox HTTP requests get fulfilled by the cache or that 73% of all Firfox HTTP/2 connections are used more than once but only 7% of the HTTP/1 ones?

Poul-Henning Kamp (author of Varnish) brought his view on HTTP/2 from an intermediary’s point of view with a slightly pessimistic view, not totally unlike what he’s published before. Stefan Eissing (from Green Bytes) entertained us by talking about his work on writing mod_h2 for Apache Httpd (and how it might be included in the coming 2.4.x release) and we got to discuss a bit around timing measurements and its difficulties.

We rounded off the afternoon with a priority and dependency tree discussion topped off with a walk-through of numbers and slides from Kazuho Oku (author of H2O) on how dependency-trees really help and from Moto Ishizawa (from Yahoo! Japan) explaining Firefox’s (Patrick’s really) implementation of dependencies for HTTP/2.

We spent the evening having a 5-course (!) meal at a nice Italian restaurant while trading war stories about HTTP, networking and the web. Now it is close to midnight and it is time to reload and get ready for another busy day tomorrow.

I’ll round off with a picture of where most of the important conversations were had today:

kafeestation

Syndicated 2015-07-27 21:55:44 from daniel.haxx.se

HTTPS and HTTP/2 plans for my sites

I produce a fair amount of open source code. I make that code available online. curl is probably the most popular package.

People ask me how they can trust that they are actually downloading what I put up there. People ask me when my source code can be retrieved over HTTPS. Signatures and hashes don’t add a lot against attacks when they all also are fetched over HTTP…

HTTPS

SSL padlockI really and truly want to offer HTTPS (only) for all my sites.  I and my friends run a whole busload of sites on the same physical machine and IP address (www.haxx.se, daniel.haxx.se, curl.haxx.se, c-ares.haxx.se, cool.haxx.se, libssh2.org and many more) so I would like a solution that works for all of them.

I can do this by buying certs, either a lot of individual ones or a few wildcard ones and then all servers would be covered. But the cost and the inconvenience of needing a lot of different things to make everything work has put me off. Especially since I’ve learned that there is a better solution in the works!

Let’s Encrypt will not only solve the problem for us from a cost perspective, but they also promise to solve some of the quirks on the technical side as well. They say they will ship certificates by September 2015 and that has made me wait for that option rather than rolling up my sleeves to solve the problem with my own sweat and money. Of course there’s a risk that they are delayed, but I’m not running against a hard deadline myself here.

HTTP/2

Related, I’ve been much involved in the HTTP/2 development and I host my “http2 explained” document on my still non-HTTPS site. I get a lot of questions (and some mocking) about why my HTTP/2 documentation isn’t itself available over HTTP/2. I would really like to offer it over HTTP/2.

Since all the browsers only do HTTP/2 over HTTPS, a prerequisite here is that I get HTTPS up and running first. See above.

Once HTTPS is in place, I want to get HTTP/2 going as well. I still run good old Apache here so it might be done using mod_h2 or perhaps with a fronting nghttp2 proxy. We’ll see.

Syndicated 2015-07-26 19:56:42 from daniel.haxx.se

890 older entries...

 

bagder certified others as follows:

  • bagder certified shughes as Journeyer
  • bagder certified andrei as Master
  • bagder certified kbob as Apprentice
  • bagder certified mbp as Master
  • bagder certified shughes as Journeyer
  • bagder certified sussman as Journeyer
  • bagder certified mpawlo as Apprentice
  • bagder certified BrucePerens as Master
  • bagder certified rmk as Master
  • bagder certified Fefe as Journeyer
  • bagder certified gstein as Master
  • bagder certified robey as Master
  • bagder certified edd as Journeyer
  • bagder certified ask as Journeyer
  • bagder certified joe as Master
  • bagder certified alan as Master
  • bagder certified pawal as Apprentice
  • bagder certified stone as Apprentice
  • bagder certified sej as Journeyer
  • bagder certified fxn as Apprentice
  • bagder certified forrest as Apprentice
  • bagder certified wsanchez as Master
  • bagder certified zagor as Journeyer
  • bagder certified ben as Master
  • bagder certified kfogel as Master
  • bagder certified orabidoo as Master
  • bagder certified linas as Master
  • bagder certified jas as Master

Others have certified bagder as follows:

  • ib certified bagder as Master
  • chipx86 certified bagder as Master
  • rupert certified bagder as Master
  • larsu certified bagder as Master
  • mvw certified bagder as Journeyer
  • neurogato certified bagder as Journeyer
  • whytheluckystiff certified bagder as Master
  • andrei certified bagder as Journeyer
  • jbowman certified bagder as Journeyer
  • alexr certified bagder as Journeyer
  • pretzelgod certified bagder as Journeyer
  • thallgren certified bagder as Journeyer
  • execve certified bagder as Master
  • pelleb certified bagder as Master
  • GJF certified bagder as Master
  • kroah certified bagder as Master
  • jooon certified bagder as Master
  • nixnut certified bagder as Journeyer
  • jLoki certified bagder as Master
  • mpawlo certified bagder as Journeyer
  • technik certified bagder as Master
  • highgeek certified bagder as Journeyer
  • Stab certified bagder as Master
  • TheCorruptor certified bagder as Master
  • sethcohn certified bagder as Master
  • elho certified bagder as Master
  • monkeyiq certified bagder as Master
  • ebf certified bagder as Master
  • jmg certified bagder as Master
  • robey certified bagder as Master
  • edd certified bagder as Master
  • jbontje certified bagder as Journeyer
  • khazad certified bagder as Master
  • walken certified bagder as Master
  • ask certified bagder as Journeyer
  • xsa certified bagder as Master
  • shlomif certified bagder as Master
  • pawal certified bagder as Master
  • CarloK certified bagder as Master
  • stone certified bagder as Master
  • lerdsuwa certified bagder as Master
  • sej certified bagder as Master
  • nny certified bagder as Journeyer
  • ks certified bagder as Journeyer
  • fxn certified bagder as Master
  • jono certified bagder as Master
  • forrest certified bagder as Master
  • rw2 certified bagder as Master
  • wsanchez certified bagder as Master
  • dlc certified bagder as Journeyer
  • zagor certified bagder as Journeyer
  • ncm certified bagder as Master
  • redi certified bagder as Master
  • ianweller certified bagder as Master
  • bwy certified bagder as Master
  • badvogato certified bagder as Journeyer
  • mnot certified bagder as Master

[ Certification disabled because you're not logged in. ]

New Advogato Features

New HTML Parser: The long-awaited libxml2 based HTML parser code is live. It needs further work but already handles most markup better than the original parser.

Keep up with the latest Advogato features by reading the Advogato status blog.

If you're a C programmer with some spare time, take a look at the mod_virgule project page and help us with one of the tasks on the ToDo list!

X
Share this page