3 Apr 2014 Stevey   » (Master)

Tagging images, and maintaining collections?

I'm an amateur photographer, although these days I tend to drop the amateur prefix, given that I shoot people for cash at least once a month.

(It isn't my main job, and I'd never actually want it to be, because I'm certain I'd become unhappy hustling for jobs and doing the promotion thing.)

Anyway over the years I've built up a large library of images, mostly organized in a hierarchy of directories beneath ~/Images.

Unlike most photographers I don't use aperture, lighttable, or any similar library management. I shoot my images in RAW, convert to JPG via rawtherapee, and keep both versions of the images.

In short I don't want to mix the "library management" functions with the "RAW conversion" because I do regard them as two separate steps. That said I'm reaching a point where I do want to start tagging images, and finding them more quickly.

In the past I wrote a couple of simple tools to inject tags into the EXIF data of images, and then indexed them. But that didn't work so well in practise. I'm starting to think instead I should index images into sqlite:

  • Size.
  • date.
  • Content hash.
  • Tags.
  • Path.

The downside is that this breaks utterly as soon as you move images around on-disk. Which is something my previous exif-manipulation was designed to avoid.

Anyway I'm thinking at the moment, but I know that the existing tools such as F-Spot, shotwell, DigiKam, and similar aren't suitable. So I either need to go standalone and use EXIF tags, accepting the fact that the tags I enter won't be visible to other tools, or I cope with the file-rename issues by attempting to update an existing sqlite database via hash/size/etc.

Syndicated 2014-04-03 11:02:30 from Steve Kemp's Blog

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