13 Mar 2012 Omnifarious   » (Journeyer)

IPv6 not the peer connectivity panacea that people think

IPv6 is supposed to solve all of the peer connectivity issues introduced by NAT. And, on the surface, it seems to do just that by making it possible to assign a unique, globally routable IP address to every conceivable device that could possibly want one.

But this doesn't really solve the problem of peer connectivity.

My cell phone, for example, may be assigned an address by my carrier. But my carrier may be unwilling to let me have any more addresses. This means that any devices I want to connect to the Internet through my cell phone will not be able to have globally routable addresses because my ISP/cell carrier won't route them. And, of course, under IPv6, nobody is ever supposed to do NAT.

So, peer connectivity is still restrained by network topology. The power to decide who gets to be a router decides what gets to connect. And this is broken.

IMHO, the solution is to have addresses assigned to things that have nothing to do with routing, and allow a routing layer on top of the network layer that can route things to those addresses regardless of the actual topology of the network. Tor is an example of this sort of thing. Tor is basically a routing layer on top of TCP/IP that's designed to obscure which routes any given piece of information takes.

But Tor is a specific example of a larger issue. Routing cannot be left ultimately controlled by anybody except network end-points. Such creates failure modes both physical and political that are significantly less than the best we can do.

Which is one of the biggest advantages to a protocol like CAKE. :-) It divorces routing from addressing and expects end-nodes to have a hand in making routing decisions.



comment count unavailable comments

Syndicated 2012-03-13 16:10:08 from Lover of ideas

Latest blog entries     Older blog entries

New Advogato Features

New HTML Parser: The long-awaited libxml2 based HTML parser code is live. It needs further work but already handles most markup better than the original parser.

Keep up with the latest Advogato features by reading the Advogato status blog.

If you're a C programmer with some spare time, take a look at the mod_virgule project page and help us with one of the tasks on the ToDo list!