Hobart is currently certified at Journeyer level.

Name: Jon Bailey
Member since: 2000-12-28 17:26:40
Last Login: 2009-06-05 13:16:23

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Homepage: http://jb.org/

Notes:

"The best thing for being sad," replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, "is to learn something. That's the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then -- to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn." -- T.H. White, "The Once and Future King"

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Windows technique to print timestamps before & after from the command line

On Unix, a quick way to output timestamps is:

$ date ; slowcommand ; date
Tue Sep  2 12:12:18 MDT 2014
Tue Sep  2 12:12:34 MDT 2014
$ 
But if you try a similar approach at the Windows command prompt, there's a few problems.
  • The command TIME /T outputs the time, but only in HH:MM format.
     
  • The command prompt's builtin magic variable %TIME% outputs HH:MM:SS.ss, but if you try it, the results are unexpected:
    C:\>echo %TIME% && SLOWCOMMAND && echo %TIME%
    13:42:05.10
    13:42:05.10

    C:\>
    The timestamps come out the same, because the command prompt does all variable substitution in a line at once, before executing the first command.

    In batch files, this can be mitigated with the setting ENABLEDELAYEDEXPANSION and referring to variables !LIKETHIS! instead of %LIKETHIS%. But that won't work at the command prompt.
The solution I used was to run the command explicitly afterwards with CMD /C , using the ^ to escape out the % character:
C:\>echo %TIME% && SLOWCOMMAND && cmd /c echo %TIME^%
13:51:27.58
13:51:46.66

C:\>
Other solutions welcome.

Syndicated 2014-09-02 20:18:46 from jon's blog

Differences in 100-pin printer memory DIMMs

My HP Color LaserJet CM1017 (CB395A) claims, according to all online documentation I can find, to take 100-pin non-DDR SDRAM. Upon ordering and trying to install the RAM, I found the notches don't line up. Here's the differences, with photo evidence. Phooey.
http://imgur.com/a/mTvFr

SDRAM pin/notch spacing: 6 pins, right notch, 16 pins, centered notch, 28 pins


DDR pin/notch spacing: 6 pins, right notch, 16 pins, right notch, 28 pins

Syndicated 2014-06-11 22:35:32 from jon's blog

I know that when someone has the temerity to say "Gosh, I wish Emacs could do X", they're generally met instantaneously with howls of derision by a teeming horde of "Ask me about my Aspergers!"-shirt-wearing neckbeards who let them know:

  • Anyone who would want to do such a thing is an idiot.
  • Doing $INSANELY_COMPLICATED_ALTERNATIVE is much better as any idiot knows.
... it's a million times funnier when that person saying "Gosh, I wish..." is Richard M. Stallman.

https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/emacs-devel/2013-11/msg00515.html

(Relevant: "if you ... think that my kids ... need to have the root password to access some wireless network, or to be able to print out a paper ... please just kill yourself now."
—Linus Benedict Torvalds
https://plus.google.com/+LinusTorvalds/posts/1vyfmNCYpi5

Syndicated 2013-11-21 23:30:08 from jon's blog

I now own more original art.

http://sellingoutforfunandprofit.com is back up, meaning Michael Poe (of Errant Story and Exploitation Now!) & his SO finally got the "give us money for stuff!" solution working after quite some time.

</blatantplug>

Syndicated 2012-07-07 18:06:44 from jon's blog

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